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Červená Barva Press
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New Releases from Červená Barva Press

The Art of Waving by Tim Suermondt

The Art of Waving
by Tim Suermondt

(Poetry chapbook)

Let's Go Back To The Mainland
by Grzegorz Wróblewski

(Poetry)

Diet of Nails by Charles S. Kraszewski Inclusions by Joanna Kurowska

Diet of Nails
by Charles S. Kraszewski

(Poetry)

Inclusions
by Joanna Kurowska

(Poetry)

A Sharp Double-Edged Luxury Object by Rodica Draghincescu Partner, Orchard, Day Moon by Michael Todd Steffen

A Sharp Double-Edged Luxury Object
by Rodica Draghincescu

(Poetry)

Partner, Orchard, Day Moon
by Michael Todd Steffen

(Poetry)


Jump to:

Full-length Books

Grzegorz Wróblewski | Charles S. Kraszewski | Joanna Kurowska | Rodica Draghincescu | Michael Todd Steffen | Susan Lewis | Denise Bergman | Mary Bonina | Jiří Klobouk | Flavia Cosma | Daniel Y. Harris | Alexander J. Motyl | Pamela L. Laskin | Dmytro Pavlychko | Michael M. Naydan | Bob Hartley | Roger W. Hecht | Diana Der-Hovanessian | George Held | Mike Amado | Denis Emorine | Judith Skillman | Morris Berman | Alexander J. Motyl | Rane Arroyo | Mary Bonina | Roberta Swann | Luis Raúl Calvo | Tam Lin Neville | Susan Tepper and Gary Percesepe | Andrey Gritsman | Mark Pawlak | Michael Nash | Timothy Gager | Pamela L. Laskin | Irene Koronas | W. R. Mayo | C. L. Bledsoe | Jaromir Horec | Nancy Mitchell | Lucille Lang Day | Lo Galluccio | Glenn Sheldon | Philip E. Burnham, Jr. | Flavia Cosma | Doug Holder


Chapbooks

Tim Suermondt | Bill Yarrow | JP Reese | Michelle Reale | Krikor Der Hohannesian | Alan Elyshevitz | Robert Vaughan | Roberto Carlos Garcia | Rachel Goldstein | Ateet Tuli | Teneice Durrant Delgado | Matthew A. Hamilton | Eric Greinke | John Elsberg | Noel Sloboda | Michael J. Atwood | Preston H. Hood | Stephen Frech | Pamela Annas | Susan Tepper | Zvi A. Sesling | Joan Gelfand | Elaine Terranova | Jendi Reiter | Hugh Fox | Daniel Y. Harris | Adam Shechter | Thom Brucie | Gulnar Ali Balata | Charles P. Ries | Stacia M. Fleegal | James Penha | Susan Lewis | Alexander G. Dryer | John Elsberg | Eric Greinke | Judson Hamilton | William Delman | Grzegorz Wróblewski | Jennifer LeBlanc | Martin Burke | Alexander Motyl | Steve Glines | Francis Alix | Ioan Tepelea | Korkut Onaran | Irene Koronas | Robert K. Johnson | Roger Sedarat | Kathleen Aguero | Eric Wasserman | Gary Beck | Mike Amado | George Held | Linda Nemec Foster | Larissa Shmailo | Chad Parenteau | Diane Wald | Catherine Sasanov | Anne Harding Woodworth | Timothy Gager | Gary Fincke | Kevin Gallagher | Adrian S. Potter | Michael Graves | Harris Gardner | Mary Bonina | Anthony Russell White | Ed McManis | Lucille Lang Day | Susanne Morning | Doug Holder | Flavia Cosma | Richard Kostelanetz | Ian Randall Wilson | Susan Tepper | Judy Ray | Gloria Mindock | Ed Miller | George Held


Plays

Denis Emorine | Denis Emorine


E-books

No One Is Safe by Susan Tepper
The Life and Death of a Literary Legend by Martin Golan
Streets Of Flowers by Martin Golan
When Annie Fell Off The Mountain by Martin Golan
Gilgamesh by Martin Burke
I Ching by Martin Burke
Near Love Stories by J. B. Hogan



Postcard Series

Postcard Series: One by Gloria Mindock



Full-length Books

March 31, 2014: Let's Go Back To The Mainland by Grzegorz Wróblewski

Let's Go Back To The Mainland by Grzegorz Wróblewski Let's Go Back To The Mainland
by Grzegorz Wróblewski
Translated from the Polish by Agnieszka Pokojska
Červená Barva Press, 2014

Grzegorz Wróblewski, born in 1962 in Gdansk and raised in Warsaw, has been living in Copenhagen since 1985. He has published ten volumes of poetry and three collections of short prose pieces in Poland; three books of poetry, a book of poetic prose and an experimental novel (translations) in Denmark; and a book of selected poems in Bosnia-Herzegovina, as well as a selection of plays. His work has been translated into fifteen languages. His recent book of prose poems, Kopenhaga, was published by Zephyr Press, 2013.


Between classical lyricism and central European surrealism, between the punk aesthetic of Mark E Smith and the existentialism of Camus, between the miniatures of Joseph Cornell and the stalker of Tarkovsky, between painting, plays, poetry, performance art, and the memoir, between Poland and Denmark and the milky way, Grzegorz Wróblewski is on the mainland. His work is the most distinct and diverse coming out out of the so-called "bruLion generation" always moving into the major leagues of this universe and perhaps others. If we don't become extinct as a species in the near future, Wroblewski will go down as one of our greatest writers, artists, and thinkers.
-Marcus Slease, author of Mu (so) Dream (window)

Cover photo: Wojciech Wilczyk

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9910091-7-6 | 96 pages | In Stock

March 18, 2014: Diet of Nails by Charles S. Kraszewski

Diet of Nails by Charles S. Kraszewski Diet of Nails by Charles S. Kraszewski
Červená Barva Press, 2014

Charles S. Kraszewski. Poet and translator. Recipient of the 2013 Award for the Promulgation of Polish Literature and Culture by the Union of Polish Writers Abroad (London). Recent publications include Beast (poems), Rossetti's Armadillo (verse translations and essays), Irresolute Heresiarch: Catholicism, Gnosticism and Paganism in the Poetry of Czeslaw Milosz. Creative in both English and Polish, he is a frequent contributor to Odra (translations of T.S. Eliot and Robinson Jeffers).

Cover art: Navajo Antelopes by Stefan Tejk

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9910091-5-2 | 87 Pages | In Stock

March, 2014: Inclusions by Joanna Kurowska

Inclusions by Joanna Kurowska Inclusions by Joanna Kurowska
Červená Barva Press, 2014

Cover Art: Untitled (1991) by Paweł Młynarczyk

Joanna Kurowska immigrated to the U.S. in 1988. After publishing two books of poetry in Poland-Ściana (The Wall), 1997 and Obok (Near), 1999-she gradually switched to English as her poetic medium. Many of her poems have appeared in American and European journals. In 2013, eLectio Publishing released The Wall & Beyond, a volume of her Polish poems translated into English. Another collection of Joanna's poetry, The Butterfly's Choice, is forthcoming in 2015, from Broadstone Books.

Inclusions is Joanna Kurowska's first book of originally English-language poems.


These mostly short, lapidary lyrics present to the reader not only a fallen world of detritus, missed emotional connections, thoughtless consumption, empty gratification, but also a world of fragile and fleeting beauty, raptures that last "but a fraction of a second," and art-making that redeems us. A town's soul leaks away as globalization grinds everyone and everything to sameness; a bishop's suit in a window is "a skin missing a body;" and a price is put on everything: "The trees have turned into business letters." This is simply the "now," as Kurowska sees it. But these are spiritual poems, though the god evoked-invoked-is not the property of any single group or mission. In the title poem, the speaker longs "to make sure/that i, too, am included/in the world deposited/on God's tongue." And always, the human possibilities, and the beauty of the world, are what we transcend to. In the final poem, to her son who asks what the meaning of life is, the poet replies, "Next to me, a feather swirls/In the air. A draft carries it/When the window is open" … To me, this is a lovely, non-Western image of the inclusion the poet prays for.
—James Cummins, Author of Still Some Cake

Inclusions is a book of surprising, reflective encounters with things as small as ants and as big as God. The ants, however, are big enough to make us think about the meaning of life and death. God, on the other hand, is small and light enough to fit into a snowflake. The poems listen to silence, loved ones now gone, cupboards and birds. Joanna Kurowska's slender verses pray by playing and masterfully lead the reader to the realization that "knowing is letting go."
—Katia Mitova, Author of Dream Diary

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-09910091-6-9 | 53 Pages | In Stock

March 7, 2014: A Sharp Double-Edged Luxury Object by Rodica Draghincescu

A Sharp Double-Edged Luxury Object by Rodica Draghincescu A Sharp Double-Edged Luxury Object
by Rodica Draghincescu
Translated from Romanian by Adam J. Sorkin with Antuza Genescu
Červená Barva Press, 2014

Cover Art: Devis Grebu

Rodica Draghincescu, born in 1962 in Buziaş, a town in the province of Timiş in the west of Romania, and now living in the region of Metz in France, was called by World Literature Today "one of the most spectacular figures in the new Romanian literature of the 1990s." She has published prize-winning books of original poetry and prose fiction in Romanian and in French (both in France and Canada), as well as translations, interviews, and essays. Her work has also appeared in translation in England, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. In 2006 Draghincescu was awarded the "Le Lien" Prize for Poetry in Nancy-Metz, France, and in 2013 the "Virgil" Prize for European poetry in Paris. Since 2007 she has served as Artistic Director of the International Poetry Festival of Metz and consultant for arts education to the institutions of culture of Lorraine, and she is editor-in-chief of the multilingual web-magazine Levure littéraire and on the editorial board of the German review Matrix.


About the Translators:
Adam J. Sorkin is a translator of contemporary Romanian literature, whose work has won the Poetry Society (U.K.) Corneliu M. Popescu Prize for European Poetry Translation for 2005, as well as the Kenneth Rexroth Memorial Translation Prize and the Ioan Flora Prize for Poetry Translation. In 2011, he published A Path to the Sea by Liliana Ursu, translated with Ursu and Tess Gallagher (Pleasure Boat Studios—Silver Award winner in poetry as a ForeWord Reviews Book of the Year), Ioan Flora’s Medea and Her War Machines, translated with Alina Cârâc (University of New Orleans Press—third-round selection for the National Translation Award), Ion Mureşan’s The Book of Winter and Other Poems, translated with Lidia Vianu (University of Plymouth Press), and The Vanishing Point That Whistles: An Anthology of Contemporary Romanian Poetry (Talisman House). In 2012, Mouths Dry with Hatred by Dan Sociu, translated with the author (Longleaf Press), and The Flying Head by Ioan Flora, translated with Elena Bortă (Toad Press), both appeared. Sorkin is Distinguished Professor of English at Penn State Brandywine.

Antuza Genescu is a free-lance translator who lives and works in Timişoara in the west of Romania. Her translations of Rodica Draghincescu with Adam J. Sorkin have appeared in literary publications in the United States, the Netherlands, and Slovenia, both in print and on the web.

Reviews:

Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2014/05/a-sharp-double-edged-luxury-object.html

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9910091-2-1 | 41 Pages | In Stock

March 7, 2014: Partner, Orchard, Day Moon by Michael Todd Steffen

Partner, Orchard, Day Moon by Michael Todd Steffen Partner, Orchard, Day Moon by Michael Todd Steffen
Červená Barva Press, 2014

Cover Art: Irene Koronas

Michael Todd Steffen’s poems and articles have appeared in Connecticut Review, Poem (HLA), ACM (Another Chicago Magazine), Ibbetson Street, Wilderness House Literary Review, Muddy River Poetry Review and in the window of the Grolier Poetry Bookshop. A graduate of Belmont in Nashville, on a Rotary International Fellowship he studied and taught in England and France. He was awarded the 2007 Somerville Newswriters Festival poetry prize, and currently lives in Cambridge where he writes and works for non-profits.


I've just come back from reading the poems in Partner, Orchard, Day Moon, full of admiration. Steffen is so alive in his writing, keen with observation, both of what things actually look like, what the wind feels like, how things grow and rot, and also of character, his own, his uncles', anybody's he sees. The book gives us many wonderfully memorable lines using his chosen meter for all its worth. This is very good work.
—David Ferry

"A very moving collection of poems. I’m enjoying reading — and re-reading—the poems."
—Kathleen Spivack, author of With Robert Lowell and His Circle: Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, Elizabeth Bishop, Stanley Kunitz and Others


Reviews:

Poet to Poet: Michael Todd Steffen, author of Partner, Orchard, Day Moon (Cervena Barva Press, 2014) interviewed by Doug Holder on SCAT TV.
http://vp.telvue.com/preview?id=T02351&video=195415

March, 17, 2014; Boston Area Small Press & Poetry Scene:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2014/03/partner-orchard-day-moon-by-michael.html

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-2-3 | 61 Pages | In Stock

January 15, 2014: How to be Another by Susan Lewis

How to be Another by Susan Lewis How to be Another by Susan Lewis
Červená Barva Press, 2014

Painting by Melissa Stern

Susan Lewis lives in New York City and edits Posit (www.positjournal.com). Her other books and chapbooks are This Visit(BlazeVOX [books], 2014), State of the Union (Spuyten Duyvil Press), The Following Message (White Knuckle Press), At Times Your Lines (Argotist e-books), Some Assembly Required (Dancing Girl Press), Commodity Fetishism, winner of the 2009 Cervena Barva Press Chapbook Award, and Animal Husbandry (Finishing Line Press). Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and published in a great number of journals and anthologies, including Berkeley Poetry Review, BlazeVOX, Cimarron Review, The Journal, The New Orleans Review, Phoebe, Raritan, Seneca Review, Verse (online), and Verse Daily.


Susan Lewis poses questions that are sine waves amid the urban ruckus of unsweetened yet unnatural nouns. She nuzzles the vibrato context that her poems would recast. Poetic prophecy thrives amid a balance between selected, anchored logic and prevailing, accurate illogic in the midst. There is a delicious sense of understatement in these poems that drive toward the surprise end of the spectrum that diverts from expectation. Along this welcome string of mysteries, we are perpetually challenged to invent new steps.
—Sheila E. Murphy

Clipped, cut, cajoling, the prose bits of Susan Lewis are pure poetry. When and whether she unravels the endless to and fro with an/other who never quite makes true contact, or provides procedural instructions on how to be some self, she never spins anything less than "the courage to tell us something new, no matter how frightening or untrue." Her capsuled narratives cohere and dissolve with the piquant absurdity of the voices they refract, then send back out into the ether. This is the kind of entropy "we might as well learn to ride like the wind" to whatever full-stop it takes us, with fun and thanks punctuating our language-voyage.
—Amy King

Waking headlong transcriptions of what poetry's dream can do that no other form of writing can: sing condensed quicksilver improvisations that are any smart feeling reader's sought after letters to the Other you too can learn to become from out a "most entertaining cave." Read these poems and be right back in the new present unfurling moment of language's immediacy—each poem is a successful risk-taking trip flying in and out of Susan Lewis' brilliancy. Rx: read this book.
—Lee Ann Brown

Susan Lewis' poems in How to Be Another offer often ironic, always eloquent testament to the agonies of relationships in general and couples in particular. Wielding incisive metaphors like a scalpel, she cuts through social poses and masks to the messy failures and disappointments that lurk underneath the surface of our all too human interactions. Her poetry is compassionate enough to capture our desire to connect with each other and wise enough to recognize our repeated and heartbreaking failure to do so.
—Howard Good


Interview with Susan Lewis by Rob Mclennan on Rob Mclennan's Blog:
http://www.robmclennan.blogspot.ca/2014/02/12-or-20-second-series-questions-with_15.html

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9910091-0-7 | 81 Pages | In Stock

December 3, 2013: The Telling by Denise Bergman

The Telling by Denise Bergman The Telling by Denise Bergman
Červená Barva Press, 2013

DENISE BERGMAN is the author of Seeing Annie Sullivan, poems based on the early life of Helen Keller's teacher. She conceived and edited City River of Voices, an anthology of urban poetry. Her poems have been widely published. An excerpt of her poem about a neighborhood slaughterhouse is installed as public art in Cambridge, Massachusetts.


Denise Bergman's second collection of poems is astonishingly original: I can't think of another work that uses something so small to such large effect. The Telling is ultimately about time and memory, art and truth, women and birth and death, and it all comes from "A sepia memory/mildeweed, perhaps, or not"-a tiny center around which Bergman's lyrical intelligence moves with haunting power and grace.
—Martha Collins

As scribe to the recounting of a few harrowing childhood hours that would shape her grandmother's life, Denise Bergman examines trauma, suppression and how the honest mind must sometimes alter truth. This, then, is no simple compassion; as the narrator bears witness to the recounting of a monumental and guilt-laden secret, Bergman searches underneath the told story. In her spare, halting lines and the wide silences between them, one senses a tender and horrified listening, and in this listening an implied counterpoint, a murmur of truths unspeakable. Every object in The Telling has a vulnerable, culpable animus. All are witnesses. Bergman's testimony acknowledges the heartbreaking necessity of amnesia.
—Frannie Lindsay

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9910091-4-5 | 84 Pages | In Stock

My Father's Eyes a memoir by Mary Bonina

My Father's Eyes by Mary Bonina My Father's Eyes a memoir by Mary Bonina
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Mary Bonina has published two collections of poetry, Clear Eye Tea and Living Proof. She is also the author of Lunch in Chinatown, a chapbook of poems inspired by the experience of teaching the English language to recent immigrants in their work places. Her poetry and prose has been featured in Gulf Stream, Salamander, English Journal, Hanging Loose, and in many other journals and several anthologies, most recently in Entering the Real World: VCCA Poets on Mt. San Angelo, celebrating forty years of the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Commissioned by composer Paul Sayed, she wrote a suite of three poems, Grace in the Wind, and Sayed's composition for piano, cello, and soprano voice had its world premiere at the Longy School of Music of Bard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts in November of 2012. Bonina is a graduate of the M.F.A. Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. In addition to being a Virginia Center for the Creative Arts Fellow since 2001 when she was named the finalist for the Goldfarb Fellowship in non-fiction, she is also a member of the Writers' Room of Boston, Inc. where she is working on a novel and a new collection of poetry. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts with her husband, poet Mark Pawlak and their son, Gianni Bonina-Pawlak.


ADVANCE PRAISE for MY FATHER’S EYES

"Not many pages into this gloriously moving book, a feeling begins to grow that it would have been a humbling yet exquisite experience to have sat and talked with Biagio John Bonina. What his daughter Mary Bonina has given us is a solid and lasting portrait of a man who was simple and complicated. (That is not a contradiction once you come to know him.)…America is a country of grand men and women who live on a modest scale, and no one fits that category more than he does. Once his eyes began to fail him, he lived even more for his family and its welfare and his efforts and work make him in my mind, the kind of real hero we fail to glorify anymore. So enter this book and come to know her father and his dedicated overwhelmingly loyal daughter, as well as a large stage of family members and friends who are unforgettable and insanely knowable and human."
—Edward P. Jones, author of The Known World

"Mary Bonina casts her considerable spell with exquisite sentences and unerring evocative details. She is a writer of inordinate compassion, formidable intelligence, and unflinching honesty. My Father’s Eyes documents a family’s coming to grips with the legacy of blindness, a daughter’s unflagging allegiance to her father, and one man’s heroic determination to live a life of independence and quiet dignity despite obstacles that would crush the strongest of us. The book is an inspiration. When I finished reading it, I walked around for days seeing the world through its lens. Yes, it’s that good. It’s that important."
—John Dufresne, author of Requiem, Mass. and No Regrets, Coyote

"Packard. Record player. Telephone party line. Fallout shelter. Holy Ghost. These and other blasts from the past make up the world of this beautiful, clear-eyed memoir that reads like a novel. It’s partly the story of a girl who loved words on her way to becoming a writer. Of all the words in her universe, the most important were eyes and seeing, for this was a girl growing up with a beloved father going blind. Becoming his guide and his eyes, she becomes herself. And what a character he is! We come to know him as if we’re all his children, one minute consumed with terror at the dangers he faces, and the next minute awed by his courage, and the next exasperated by his human flaws. And ultimately, we see and feel for ourselves what his daughter means when she says, “I know about love from being my father’s eyes."
—Ellen Cooney, author of A Private Hotel for Gentle Ladies

$18.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-8-5 | 290 Pages | In Stock

New Release: My Life With Blondie by Jiří Klobouk

My Life With Blondie by Jiří Klobouk My Life With Blondie by Jiří Klobouk
Červená Barva Press, September, 2013

Jiří Klobouk writes fiction, radio plays, poetry and essays. He discovered jazz when he was twelve and later began to visualize the world around him through a camera lens - he worked for 20 years in television. These experiences are reflected in his writing. He created a body of work in which as one critique noted: "We could feel the rhythm and see things from unexpected angles." Many short stories have appeared in literary periodicals: Partisan Review, Chicago Review, Stories and Artful Dodge. For Winter Wolves, a story published in Mid-American Review, he was named outstanding writer in the 1985-86 The Pushcart Prize edition. His list of books includes: My Life with Blondie, Winfield, Radio Plays I, Radio Plays II, Music After Midnight, The Stair Climber, Anti-Communist Manifesto (1975), The Homecoming, JAZZ II: Parents and Third Wife. The author lives in New York City.

Translated from the Czech by Helena and John Baker


A fifty-year-old man, named Harley Davidson, has suffered from a vivid fantasy, a condition not as rare as it might seem: alongside reality, which he perceives accurately, he has created for himself a second, parallel world of dreams. When he was seventeen, he fell in love with Blondie he saw on a magazine cover. For the next thirty-three years all he wants is to tell her that he loves her. As time goes by it seems it will never happen, but then one day...

...thirty three years later Harley learns that Blondie (inevitably an aging starlet) is arriving in town to perform at a local bar. She has reserved a room in the rundown hotel where Harley works as a receptionist. Finally, he is convinced his dream will come true.

In this novel, we become acquainted with Harley’s entire life - from childhood, through the demise of two marriages. We follow him on his journey to Austria, Portugal, Germany and Vietnam. It is a story of a human being who, inspired by the power of love, keeps his spirit intact against all odds and circumstances.

$18.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-6-1 | 284 Pages | In Stock

New release: On Paths Known to No One Poems by Flavia Cosma

On Paths Known to No One Poems by Flavia Cosma On Paths Known to No One
Poems by Flavia Cosma
Červená Barva Press, 2012

Flavia Cosma is an award winning Romanian-born Canadian poet, author and translator. She has a Masters degree in Electrical Engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest. Later she studied Drama at the Community School of Arts—Bucharest, Romania. She is also an award winning independent television documentary producer, director, and writer, and has published seventeen books of poetry, a novel, a travel memoir and five books for children. Her work has been represented in numerous anthologies in various countries and languages, and her book, 47 Poems, (Texas Tech University Press) received the ALTA Richard Wilbur Poetry in Translation Prize.

Cosma was nominated three times for The Pushcart Prize with poems from Leaves of a Diary (2006), The Season of Love (2008) and Thus Spoke the Sea (2008).

Flavia Cosma was awarded Third Prize in the John Dryden Translation Competition- 2007, for co-translating In The Arms of The Father, poems by Flavia Cosma, (British Comparative Literature Association & British Literary Translation Centre)

Cosma’s Songs at the Aegean Sea made the Short List in the Canadian Aid Literary Awards Contest, Dec. 2007. Her translation into Romanian of Burning Poems by George Elliott Clarke was published in Romania in 2006. Her translation from Spanish into Romanian of work by the Argentinean poet Luis Raul Calvo was published in 2009 under the title Nimic Pentru Aici, Nimic Pentru Dincolo. Her translation of work by the USA poet Gloria Mindock was published in 2010 under the title La Portile Raiului. Her translation into English of Profane Uncertainties by the Argentinean poet Luis Raul Calvo was published by Červená Barva Press in 2010.

Flavia Cosma was appointed International Affairs Chair for The League of Canadian Poets in 2008.

Cosma’s poetry book Leaves of a Diary was studied at the University of Toronto E. J. Pratt Canadian Literature during the school year 2007-2008. Flavia was decorated with the Golden Medal and was appointed Honorary Member by the Casa del Poeta Peruano, Lima, Peru, 2010, for her poetry and her work as an international cultural promoter.

Flavia Cosma is the director of the International Writers’ and Artists’ Residency, Val-David, Quebec, Canada

Flavia Cosma: http://www.flaviacosma.com


As in Flavia Cosma's whole literary production, nature isn't reduced here to the role of a neutral backdrop to the poet's life; it influences her imagination and consciousness in innumerable ways becoming a source of inspiration for a thorough studying of existing ideas and for awakening new ones. Flavia is an expert in using nature as an adequate space for metaphors, comparisons, symbols. She humanizes nature, granting it an interior life, with the highest intensity, at the supreme level.
—Dr. Irena Harasimowicz-Zazecka PhD Philology, University of Bucharest, Romania

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-6-7 | 128 Pages | In Stock

New release: Hyperlinks of Anxiety by Daniel Y. Harris

Hyperlinks of Anxiety by Daniel Y. Harris Hyperlinks of Anxiety by Daniel Y. Harris
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Daniel Y. Harris holds a Master of Arts in Divinity from The University of Chicago, where he specialized in the history and hermeneutics of religion and wrote his dissertation on The Zohar. He is the author of The New Arcana (with John Amen, New York Quarterly Books, 2012), Paul Celan and the Messiah’s Broken Levered Tongue: An Exponential Dyad (with Adam Shechter, Červená Barva Press, 2010; picked by The Jewish Forward as one of the 5 most important Jewish poetry books of 2010) and Unio Mystica (Cross-Cultural Communications, 2009). He is a three-time Pushcart Prize nominee. His poetry, experimental writing, art and essays have been published in The Denver Quarterly, European Judaism, Exquisite Corpse, The New York Quarterly, Poetry Salzburg Review, among others.
His website is www.danielyharris.com.


Daniel Y. Harris’s new volume of poetry brings together a range of texts – older and newer – evocative of the qualms and uncertainties of our new millennium. A subtle and highly affective read.
—Sander L. Gilman, Distinguished Professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences; Professor of Psychiatry, Emory University

Is cyberspace the most recent iteration of the diaspora? Will the next Zohar be composed in computer code? Can notarikon generate lyric poems out of the discourses of pharmacology, neurology, biophysics…? Welcome to the Hotel Url, Daniel Y. Harris, sole owner and proprietor, where these questions—and others that the reader has yet to dream—will be answered. No need to be anxious: in less than a nanosecond, the hyperlinks elaborated in Harris’s poems will whisk you from catastrophe creation to apocalypse and beyond. Beam me up, Ezekiel!
—Norman Finkelstein, Professor of English, Xavier University and author of On Mount Vision: Forms of the Sacred in Contemporary American Poetry

Daniel Y. Harris combines impressive erudition with a profound awe for continuity—that the eternal energies underlying Life itself constantly (re)iterate and (re)incarnate in myriad waxing and waning forms. Ideas birth Art; Art births Ideas. In such fashion, to employ classic terms, the heart and mind forge a dynamic union resulting in both clarity of perception and depth of feeling. These are poems to be read and reread, concepts and descriptive phrases operating like portals into other worlds. In Hyperlinks of Anxiety, Harris functions as a twenty-first century, digital alchemist, adeptly yoking the abstract and concrete, offering us singular and transformative experiences, all the while reminding us that Poetry is trans-authorial, Mystery our only true teacher.
—John Amen, author of At the Threshold of Alchemy; editor of The Pedestal Magazine


Reviews

Review by John Amen:
http://www.albany.edu/offcourse/issue54/john_amen_review_d_y_harris.html

Stride Magazine (Out of England):
http://www.stridemagazine.co.uk/Stride%20mag%202013/July%202013/Fear%20The%20Moral%20Nebulae.htm

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-4-7 | 156 Pages | In Stock

May 3, 2013: Sweet Snow A novel of the Ukrainian famine of 1933 by Alexander J. Motyl

Sweet Snow A novel of the Ukrainian famine of 1933 by Alexander J. Motyl Sweet Snow A novel of the Ukrainian famine of 1933
by Alexander J. Motyl
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Cover Photograph: Mark Hewko

Alexander Motyl is a writer, painter, and professor. He is the author of four novels, Whiskey Priest, Who Killed Andrei Warhol, The Jew Who Was Ukrainian, and Sweet Snow, and two novellas, Flippancy and My Orchidia; his poems have appeared in Mayday, Counterexample Poetics, Istanbul Literary Review, Orion Headless, The Battered Suitcase, Red River Review, Green Door, and New York Quarterly. He has done performances of his fiction and poetry at the Cornelia Street Café and the Bowery Poetry Club in New York. Motyl’s artwork is represented on the Internet gallery, www.artsicle.com, and has been exhibited in solo and group shows in New York, Philadelphia, Westport, and Toronto. He teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York.


Sweet Snow is set in the winter of 1933 in Ukraine. A terrible famine is raging in the countryside, while the Soviet secret police is arresting suspected spies in the cities. A German nobleman from Berlin, a Jewish communist from New York, a Polish diplomat from Lwów, and a Ukrainian nationalist from Vienna come to share a cell in some unknown prison. One day, as they are being transported to another prison, their van overturns, their guards are killed, and they are freed — to wander amidst the devastated villages, desolate landscapes, snowbound villages, and frozen corpses. As they struggle to survive, they come to grips with the horror of the famine as well as with their own delusions, weaknesses, and mortality.

$18.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-7-8 | 154 Pages | In Stock

May 12, 2013: The Bonsai Curator by Pamela L. Laskin

The Bonsai Curator by Pamela L. Laskin The Bonsai Curator by Pamela L. Laskin
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Pamela L. Laskin is a lecturer in the English Department, where she directs the Poetry Outreach Center. Poetry collections include: Remembering Fireflies and Secrets of Sheets (Plain View Press), Van Gogh’s Ear (Červená Barva Press), Daring Daughters/Defiant Dreams (A Gathering of Tribes), and The Plagiarist (Dos Madres Press). Several children’s books have been published.


In The Bonsai Curator, through metaphor, myth, and fairy tale, Pam Laskin chronicles a life, from the figurative museum, into the woods, then out of that museum, into the world. But my favorite moments live in her language and imagery, like: “The pines, bamboo, and plum trees... from the same father, / a recluse / who made his children lovely, / but lonely.” / and “I am good at stunting growth; / I’ve kept myself / five forever.” As always, Laskin doesn’t blink, and she doesn’t flinch, either.
—Estha Weiner

In this subtly complex collection of poems, Pam Laskin takes the image of bonsai—stunted and scarred into beauty through deliberate human artifice—and makes it a metaphor of being mothered, smothered and “wretchedly loved.” Then with great deftness, she uproots the image and offers us a fresh and expansive vision of a tree, one that summons us to the sprawling beauty of parenting—and of poetry—that is nurtured in respect and love.
—David Groff, Author of CLAY


Bonsai Beauty

I have been birthed/unearthed
from air,

a mutation
my odd, atrophied limbs
are startling.

Like a fixture I stand
paralyzed
by motherless memories.

Yes, there is a tree here
but at fifty
I still can't grow.

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-5-4 | 72 Pages | 7 in Stock

November 7, 2012: Červená Barva Press proudly announces the publication of our 100th book!

Two Colors of the Soul: The Selected Poetry of Dmytro Pavlychko, Edited and with an introduction by Michael M. Naydan Two Colors of the Soul: The Selected Poetry of Dmytro Pavlychko
Edited and with an introduction by Michael M. Naydan
Červená Barva Press, 2012

Cover Art: “Two” by Olha Fedoruk

Translated from the Ukrainian by Svitlana Bednazh, Gladys Evans, Michael M. Naydan, Dzvinia Orlowsky, Mary Skrypnyk, Aliona Sydorenko, Martha B. Trofimenko, and Walter May.

Dmytro Pavlychko has been an editor, translator, literary critic, film scriptwriter, ambassador, and pro-democracy political figure. He was born in 1929 in a rural village close to the Carpathian Mountains. In 1944-5 he was imprisoned at the age of 15 by the Soviets on fabricated charges for alleged activities on behalf of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army. He has published twenty collections of poetry, as well as several books of poetry translations and literary criticism. Many of his poems have been set to music and turned into songs, with ones such as “Two Colors” becoming national classics known by Ukrainians virtually everywhere. In 1977 Pavlychko received the Shevchenko Prize, the most prestigious literary award in Ukraine. Pavlychko served as ambassador to Slovakia from 1995-1998 and later to Poland from 1999-2002. He was elected a member of the Ukrainian parliament in 2005. He has received the designation of Hero of Ukraine from the Ukrainian government as well as honorary doctorates from Lviv National University and Warsaw University.

He continues to reside in the capital city of Kyiv and remains active in public life. Two Colors of the Soul: The Selected Poetry of Dmytro Pavlychko is his first book of poetry translated and published into English. From the Introduction: DMYTRO PAVLYCHKO: POET AND STATESMAN by Michael M. Naydan


In the tradition of poet-statesmen Neruda and Seferis, Pavlychko writes about his twin passions, love and history. Courageous, direct, and plain-spoken, he has long deserved a place on the international literary stage and Michael Naydan’s skillfully edited selections should confirm it.
—Askold Melnyczuk, award-winning novelist, author and editor

Out of Stock, Please Order it from SPD Books:
http://www.spdbooks.org/Producte/9780988371309/two-colors-of-the-soul-the-selected-poetry-of-dmytro-pavlychko.aspx

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-0-9 | 90 Pages | Temporarily out of stock
Following Tommy a novel by Bob Hartley Following Tommy a novel by Bob Hartley
Červená Barva Press, 2012

Bob Hartley was raised on the West Side of Chicago. He holds an MFA in fiction writing from the University of Pittsburgh. He has been, among other things, a writer, actor, singer, teacher, bartender, mail room clerk, and soap mold washer. He currently makes his living as a respiratory therapist and lives in Pittsburgh with his wife and two children. Following Tommy is his first novel.

Following Tommy tells the story of the O'Days, two young brothers living in an Irish American, working class neighborhood on Chicago’s West Side in the 1960’s. As thieves they are the bane of the neighborhood until the arrival of the first African American family.


“Following Tommy,” is a powerful, mesmerizing debut novel by Bob Hartley. Sharp-edged and honed to perfection, this novel takes us back to the Irish ghetto of the West Side of Chicago in the early ‘60’s. These characters pack-a-punch to the gut: tough, perceptive and shrewd. An unforgettable read.
—Meg Tuite, author of Domestic Apparition

In Hartley’s novel, set in the heartland of America, we dive deeply into disturbing pathos of intriguing and relatable characters. His keen narrative balances so the lively dialogue, and we feel we know, or at the very least, can relate to so much of his book. I urge you to read this remarkable debut, “Following Tommy.”
—Robert Vaughan, editor of Flash Fiction Fridays


Bob Hartley's Website: https://sites.google.com/site/bobhartleyfollowingtommy/


Reviews:

The Small Press Book Review:
http://thesmallpressbookreview.blogspot.com/2013/10/review-of-bob-hartleys-following-tommy.html

Gapers Block:
http://gapersblock.com/bookclub/2013/08/27/at_first_glance_theres_something/

Alt Hist; Historical Fiction and Alternate History:
http://althistfiction.com/2013/05/21/book-review-following-tommy-by-bob-hartley/

Books in Brief Review:
http://booksinbrief.net/2013/02/11/following-tommy-by-bob-hartley/

The Historical Novels Review:
http://historicalnovelsociety.org/reviews/following-tommy/

RALPH Review:
http://www.ralphmag.org/HH/tommy.html

Evergreen Review:
http://www.evergreenreview.com/b/following-tommy-by-bob-hartley-reviewed-by-kevin-riordan/

Ofi Press has archived its Following Tommy review:
Here is the new link.
http://theofipress.webs.com/hartleybob.htm

Pittsburgh City Paper review:
http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/novel-explores-racism-in-chicago/Content?oid=1580219

Boston University Radio Interview:
http://wtbunews.wordpress.com:80/2012/09/07/author-bob-hartley-discusses-new-book-following-tommy-racial-tensions-in-chicagos-west-side/

Pittsburgh Post Gazette Review:
http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/ae/book-reviews/bob-hartleys-following-tommy-sharp-as-chicago-651535/

Review by Irene Koronas: http://dougholder.blogspot.com/

August 23, 2012
"A Little Gem" by Noel Ignatiev, PM Press:
http://www.pmpress.org/content/article.php?story=20120822160414534


Out of Stock, Please Order it from SPD Books:
http://www.spdbooks.org/Search/Default.aspx?SearchTerm=Following+Tommy

$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-8-6 | 104 Pages | Temporarily out of stock
Talking Pictures by Roger W. Hecht
Červená Barva Press, 2012

Roger W. Hecht grew up in Wheaton, Maryland, in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. His work has been published in Denver Quarterly, Columbia Poetry Review, Mudlark, Diagram, Prick of the Spindle, and other on-line and off-line journals. He was the winner of Syracuse University’s Delmore Schwartz Poetry Award. He is the author of a poetry chapbook, Lunch at the Table of Opposites (Red Dancefloor Press), and editor of The Erie Canal Reader: 1790-1950 (Syracuse University Press). Roger earned an M.F.A. from the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University. He is currently an Assistant Professor of English at SUNY, College at Oneonta. Roger lives with his wife, Joan Marcus, and two daughters near Ithaca, New York.


Roger W. Hecht’s Talking Pictures is a vivid book of poems which draws us to “....this underworld.” He invites us to have a glance, a look, and then we as readers are deftly taken elsewhere. The taking (and the “talking!”) provides a keen sense of tempo and tone. The poetry is also often comic: in the strangely heroic poem “The Rumsfeld Sestina” (imagine!) the question is raised “What will they do once they catch you?” “You ask me what I knew and when I knew it” (from the same poem) hints at the kind of personal and impersonal worlds and factors which impinge, at least, on all of us. I return to Talking Pictures with pleasure. The variations Hecht employs in the poems’ shapes and cadences intrigue.
—Michael Burkard, Author of Entire Dilemma and Unsleeping

Roger W. Hecht’s vocal and evocative collection, Talking Pictures, collects all right, is stuffed with stuff. The things (not poems exactly and not so much prose either but some hybrid unbranded entity) collected here have a thing for thing-ness. It is as if Hecht has constructed an elaborate yet elegant filter that slows the speed of light, turning it into a rich syrup, a saturated plasma, and gorgeous chunks of heretofore unknown matter materialize out of the either or ether. Picture that!
—Michael Martone, Author of Four for a Quarter

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-5-5 | 50 Pages | In Stock
Now I See It Shaped Poems by Diana Der-Hovanessian Now I See It Shaped Poems
by Diana Der-Hovanessian
Červená Barva Press, 2011

DIANA DER-HOVANESSIAN, author of 15 books of translations and ten volumes of her own poems, has been a Fulbright professor of American poetry twice and led workshops in poetry and the literature of human rights at many universities including Clark, Harvard, MIT, Southern Connecticut. Her awards include prizes from American Scholar, Prairie Schooner, the Paterson Prize, the Columbia U. Armand-Erpf Translation prize, N.E.A. and P.E.N. awards.

From the Forward
Poets have been playing with forms since the beginning of printed poetry. In the Middle Ages, many poems appeared in the shapes of altars and crosses, And in the fifties European poets began a combination of poster art and poetry, using flung words on the page and/or shaped verse.

Diana Der-Hovanessian in her twenty years as a visiting poet in the Massachusetts schools found her students, especially younger ones, not only were fascinated by the forms, but enjoyed shaping their own.

To Maro Image

"Among our most readable and enjoyable American poets, Diana Der-Hovanessian stands high... if you think you don't like poetry, (her work) will quickly change your mind; if you're already a hopeless poetry addict, you'll be lavishly rewarded."
—X.J.Kennedy

"The range and variety, (of her poems) from the witty and wry to the sad and poignant create a unique portrait of our time, as only superb poetry can"
—F.D. Reeve

"Profoundly touching."
—Adrienne Rich

"A brilliant poet who has opened up the book of her people to the English speaking world"
—D.M. Thomas, London Times Literary Supplement

"Compelling , funny, sad, moving, doing all the things poems are supposed to do and usually don't"
—Joel Oppenheimer

Cover Art: Maro Dalley

$13.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-6-2 | 33 Pages | In Stock
After Shakespeare: Selected Sonnets by George Held After Shakespeare: Selected Sonnets
by George Held
Červená Barva Press, 2011

George Held is a teacher, translator, writer, and poet whose work has appeared in such places as The Philadelphia Inquirer, Confrontation, Notre Dame Review, New York Quarterly, and Rattle, as well as on NPR and in two dozen anthologies. A five-time Pushcart Prize nominee, he has published a book, ten chapbooks, and two e-books of poetry and edited Touched by Eros, an anthology of erotic verse. He holds a B.A. from Brown, an M.A. from University of Hawaii, and a Ph.D. from Rutgers, taught at Queens College for 37 years, was a Fulbright lecturer in Czechoslovakia (1973-76), and serves on the executive board of The South Fork Natural History Museum, Bridgehampton, NY. He lives in Greenwich Village, with his wife, Cheryl.


George Held's new collection of sonnets, After Shakespeare, is, at every turn, funny, surprising, and sharply observed. In poem after poem, Held follows Ezra Pound's injunction and "makes it new." Whether they are about Edmund Spenser on the E-train, painter Alice Neel or the Kennedy family, Held's poems delight with their music, and at the same time offer a deep wisdom. I love the way Held reinvents poetic tradition here and the way these poems, as he writes in "Discord," bring "joy beyond harmonic motion."
—Nicole Cooley

Beginning with his cheeky title (a chronological placement rather than a stylistic description) there is much to enjoy and admire in this new collection of sonnets from George Held. It is as though the awareness of his own belatedness is liberating to the poet, allowing him to explore all manner of interesting topics in a variety of sonnet forms and styles. Anyone interested in the vitality and accomplishment of the contemporary sonnet will want George Held's After Shakespeare.
—Charles Martin

To Hope

You're the thing with feathers, flying skyward
To inspire us when we lack the divine
Afflatus, lifting our spirits, like prime
Vintage or even swill like Thunderbird.

You're what springs eternal in the human
Breast, though eternity remains unproved,
Just hyperbole to cheer an unloved
One or fodder for some preacher's sermon.

But skeptical as we may be, inured
To loss of jobs and sinking stock prices,
Unfaithful friends and false mistresses,
Past the point where pride can still be injured,
Ears still prick up to your springtime twitter,
Unhibernating souls long in winter.


First Literary Review-East

After Shakespeare: Selected Sonnets by George Held
Cervená Barva Press, Somerville, MA (2011)
ISBN #978-0-9831041-9-3

Reviewer: Arthur McMaster
Click here: Book Review - George Held's "After Shakespeare: Selected Sonnets"


$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-9-3 | 71 Pages | In Stock
The Book of Arrows by Mike Amado The Book of Arrows by Mike Amado
Edited by Jack Scully and Nancy Brady Cunningham
Červená Barva Press, 2011
Mike Amado

Accept life
In all its beginnings
Accept life
In all its blooming
Accept life
In all its endings

-Mike Amado, December 2008

This was penned by Mike less than a month from when he left us. In this book we try to show you a picture of Mike's early life in Plymouth and his family (Beginnings). How his poetry evolved from the dark to tell us about things which he believed were wrong and should be changed, especially the wrongs done against "Native Americans" and the warehousing of kidney patients into dialysis units (Blooming). In October of 2008 Mike knew that his time was coming to an end and this book includes seven poems written during the last months before his death (Endings). Mike had almost 500 unpublished poems. In his final months he put some of them in collections on his computer in what he called books. Most of the poems in this volume were under the heading of The Book of Arrows; thus, our title. This collection is fondly dedicated to Michael "Mike" "Spokenwarrior" Amado (April 23, 1975-January 2, 2009).
Jack and Nancy


And if I were to cut the thread,/it’ll be my best act of rebellion./I was brought up to be a fighter. Mike Amado was the bravest of poets. Not only for his writing, but also for the way he lived. He took on his doomed life with poetry of honesty and hope. The few times I was fortunate to meet him he was, outwardly, a happy man, not mutually exclusive from his suffering. Moreover he was a deep thinker and writer of great poetry. He truly was a fighter for those who needed a champion and against the illness to which he finally succumbed. His legacy is that bravery, his poetic career and this book of poems.
—Zvi A. Sesling, author King of the Jungle & Editor, Muddy River Poetry Review

The Book of Arrows. No kidding. Mike Amado filled his quiver, took aim, and let these poems fly like his life depended on it. It did. An arrow for a childhood of poverty where he slept in the living room so he dreamed on the pillow/just underneath a picture of cats on a fence. An arrow for school which he loathed, often sick, embarrassed in pants from the irregular store, so he learned to learn on my own. An arrow for the dad who left him with only his name so he took his Native name Spider Song because Native custom says that name/passes from mother to child. Arrows for an awkward adolescence of denim jackets, tight jeans, mohawks, and heavy metal all beaten on his teenage passion, the drums! An arrow for European invaders, protesting, dressing and dancing in used regalia at the pow wow. Arrow after arrow for the disease that chased him down from the age of seventeen, challenging death, Who says the story ends? Who says indeed and Mike Amado wasn’t giving in without having his say. I never understood when someone called a poet or poem brave. These poems are not acts of bravery, the living of the life of these poems is what’s brave, a life of dreaming, loving, protesting, drumming, writing, standing on stage as the Spoken Word Warrior.
—David R. Surette, poet, author of The Immaculate Conception Mothers’ Club

Mike Amado has left us an astounding body of work that is both insightful and unsettling. Each poem reads like a memoir tinged with an a keen awareness of the unspoken. Michael, from the Hebrew,/Who is like God,/an Archangel with a sword. To call his work compelling is an understatement. Mike’s poems live. Mike’s poems sing.
—January Gill O’Neil, author of Underlife

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-4-8 | 62 Pages | In Stock
Letters to Saïda Poems by Denis Emorine Letters to Saïda Poems by Denis Emorine
Translated by Brian Cole
Červená Barva Press, 2011

Denis Emorine is the author of short stories, essays, poetry, and theater. He was born in 1956 in Paris and studied literature at the Sorbonne (University of Paris). His theatrical output has been staged in France and Russia. He has a great interest for Eastern Europe. In 2004, he won first prize (French) for his poetry at the Féile Filiochta International competition. His poetry has been published in Pphoo (India), Blue Beat Jacket (Japan), Snow Monkey, Cokefishing, Be Which Magazine, Poesia, (USA). His texts also appear on ezines such as: Cipher Journal, Mad Hatter’s Review, Milk, The Salt River Review, Istanbul Literary Review, Wilderness House Literary Review. http://denis.emorine.free.fr


“A language with a mysterious syntax” invades us, covers us with sensual charm, a nostalgic music: this is the new collection of Denis Emorine Letters to Saïda which invites us to decipher it, invites us to participate in its birth: “co-(n)naissance.” Participative birth of the world, of life and of death through love. “I understand my life better/through you” (18) writes the poet and “I know that dying exists.” And the words, taking their cue from his assertions “fall over themselves in (his) mouth,” indomitably, and proceed to the dreamed syntax “to keep a small measure of eternity.”
—Stella Vinitchi Radulescu, Professor of French at Northwestern University

$16.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-5-0 | 60 Pages | In Stock
The White Cypress by Judith Skillman The White Cypress by Judith Skillman
Červená Barva Press, 2011

Judith Skillman is the author of thirteen full-length books of poetry. Her collection, Heat Lightning: New and Selected Poems 1986 – 2006 was published by Silverfish Review Press. She is the recipient of an award from the Academy of American Poets for Storm, Blue Begonia Press, 1998. She has also received grants from King County Arts Commission and Washington State Arts Commission.


Judith Skillman’s new collection, The White Cypress, is a finely textured weave that astutely examines the “seven deadly sins” from varying points-of-view. Certainty is erased as the reader is immersed in a mercurial blend of myth and personal history. Though we learn that “stunting” can be caused by denial, there is also a “violence in pleasure and leisure” as subtext. Each cherub embodies a nymph, the exotic the familiar. Using crafty fluctuation, these poems dislocate the reader so that firm ground is not an option. Skillman’s world is strangely fluid, yet layered with complexities that complement one moment and subtly contradict the next. The White Cypress asks us to ponder the residual problems of naming (our) “sins.”
—Katherine Soniat, author of The Swing Girl

Judith Skillman’s poems are finely hewn, well-balanced, and compelling. Whatever her subject matter—ants, a lemon, September, a harbor, a plum tree—her pieces unfurl, progress, and culminate seamlessly; narratives, portraiture, and commentaries infused with palpable images, lines destined for epigraphy. This is poetry worth reading and rereading.
—John Amen, author of At the Threshold of Alchemy, editor of The Pedestal Magazine

Skillman’s poem embrace matter rather than meaning, and all manner of matter—from the Hellenic to the Hebrew, from the heroic to the quotidian. All are pumped and stitched into the skillful skein of Skillman’s work.
—Meredith Davies Hathaway, Poetry International

As one privileged to hold a front-row seat to the blossoming of Judith Skillman as an award-winning poet, I am always happy to treat myself to more of the apt language that she uses to illuminate the intricacies of human relationships. I saw the flowering of this talent, and am happy to add my voice as witness to its craft and its power.
—Jesse Glass, author of The Passion of Phineas Gage & Selected Poems, Professor, Meikei University, Tokyo, editor of Ahadada Press


Raven Chronicles:
http://ravenchronicles.org/Reviews/17-Daley-Skillman.html

The White Cypress is reviewed in The Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene
Scroll down to: June 28, 2011
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-2-4 | 67 Pages | In Stock
Counting Blessings by Morris Berman Counting Blessings by Morris Berman
Červená Barva Press, 2011

Morris Berman is an essayist, novelist, social critic, and cultural historian. He has written ten books and more than one hundred articles, and has taught at a number of universities in Europe, North America, and Mexico. He won the Governor’s Writers Award for Washington State in 1990, and was the first recipient of the annual Rollo May Center Grant for Humanistic Studies in 1992. In 2000, The Twilight of American Culture was named a “Notable Book” by the New York Times Book Review. During 2003-6 he was Visiting Professor of Sociology at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and Visiting Professor in Humanities at the Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mexico City, during 2008-9. Counting Blessings is his first volume of poetry.

Counting Blessings is an expression of gratitude for a life lived away from the madding crowd. This poetry collection was penned about a year after Berman moved to a small town in Mexico. With the frenzy of American life receding into the background, he was able to sink into the stillness of his new surroundings, allowing long-dormant creative energies to surface. In addition to Counting Blessings, he also wrote a novel and a collection of essays questioning the values of American society, roughly during the same time.

As it turns out, only a few of these poems are about life in Mexico per se. For the most part, Mexico provided the backdrop, the peaceful context in which the author’s unconscious processes were free to roam over the inner landscape, explore its contours and fine details. What emerged were vibrant memories of childhood and adolescence, of times lived abroad, of people who have come and gone. These lyrical poems capture the extraordinary essence of ordinary lived experience, and in doing so represent the true content of our lives, the simple core of what makes us human.

The poet Paul Christensen wrote of this work:

“The[se] poems are a kind of sketch pad for how one regains a life little by little from a culture that had wrapped its tentacles about you and squeezed out your breath. There is the slow process of putting oneself back together again, far from the screeching music of the television, the hard sell of the radio, the hysterical momentum of consumption as a stay against loneliness. All that abates as the exile sits in his [courtyard] with a good book, a quiet heart. The reader who pores over these memories aand observations will feel the ache to slip away to one’s own courtyard in a foreign country, to sit and let the mind idle over its thoughts, to float back to the quiet and calm and, as Berman says, to count one’s blessings.”


The Courtyard

Sitting in the small courtyard that adjoins my house
is sometimes what I imagine heaven will be like.
I do it nearly every morning.
It's full of plants-
some of them quite tall-
and one occasionally puts forth deep purple flowers
more royal than the king's robe in ancient Egypt,
or maybe it was the emperor's in Rome, I forget.
The outside wall has no doorbell
but rather an actual bell, on a chain,
hanging in a kind of grotto,
the kind you might see in a campanile in Italy
or on display in Philadelphia
only much smaller, of course.
It's a ritual, after breakfast:
I plunk myself down in a wrought iron chair
next to a wrought iron table (one covered with a pane of glass)
and smoke a small cigar
while I sit and read.
Occasionally, someone rings the bell:
"¡Agua Ciel!" he cries
and I get up, and tell him
"no, gracias; tengo suficiente."
There is also a sculpted rosemary bush
that smells divine.
I can sit there all day, if I want,
in my bathrobe (the neighbors from across the street
looking down at me, from their upstairs apartment)
but eventually I get up,
water the plants,
go back inside,
and get dressed.
Sometimes I wonder who will inherit the house-
a friend, a lover-
and whether they will sit in the very same chair,
and look at the very same plants.
Of course, I plan to live to a ripe old age
having read, some years ago, Irving Berlin's obituary
and thinking I too could make it to 101.
Hopefully my Spanish will be better by then.
But if the nurse asks me,
as I'm about to wink out,
if I want more life,
I hope I'll just smile
and tell her as gently as I can,
"no, gracias; tengo suficiente."


Reviews and Interviews

Dissident Voice, July 12, 2011:
Dissident Voice


Pointing A Way: A Review of Morris Berman’s Counting Blessings
By Gary Corseri
Published in Dandelion Salad and The Greanville Post

Dandelion Salad
The Greanville Post

Also in:
Hollywood Progressive
Smirking Chimp


Review of Counting Blessings
Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene
July 9th, 2011:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/


Morris Berman Interview on KPFA.org program "Against the Grain", hosted by C. S. Song:
website is http://www.juliollosa.com/; click on "Morris Berman" on the left hand side of the page; then on "Audio Interviews"; and then scroll down and click on "Poetry reading at Moe's Books."

Click here to order this book from Amazon.com

$16.00 | ISBN: 978-0-578-08091-8 | 44 Pages | Restocking
The Jew Who Was Ukrainian by Alexander J. Motyl The Jew Who Was Ukrainian or
How One Man’s Rip-Roaring Romp through an Existential Wasteland Ended in a Bungled Attempt to Bump off the Exceptionally Great Leader of Mother Russia
by Alexander J. Motyl
Červená Barva Press, 2011

Alexander J. Motyl (b. 1953, New York) is a writer, painter, and professor. He is the author of four novels, Whiskey Priest, Who Killed Andrei Warhol, Flippancy, and The Jew Who Was Ukrainian; his poems have appeared in Counterexample Poetics, Istanbul Literary Review, Orion Headless, The Battered Suitcase, Red River Review, and New York Quarterly. Motyl’s artwork has been exhibited in solo and group shows in New York, Philadelphia, and Toronto. He teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York.


The Jew Who Was Ukrainian is a devilishly witty intellectual farce in which historical meditation faces off with madcap lampoons of past and present political rogues and assassins. Motyl’s wildly imaginative riff on a century of East European history is a must read. The Moral of the Popcorn reigns!
—Catharine Theimer Nepomnyashchy
Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Russian Literature, Barnard College

Only Alexander Motyl could conjure up this delightful mixture of ghoulish, existential madcappery with insightful, satirical brilliance. This is a fantasy for the adventuresome, geopolitical reader who’s eager to have his mind bent and tickled.
—Jed Feuer
Composer, New York City

This hilarious and poignant anti-historical novel is a vertiginous journey through the Russian Revolution, Stalin’s purges, Nazi concentration camps, underground anarchist gatherings, and the KGB network. A great master of tragicomedy, Alexander Motyl shows with eminent irony that twentieth-century history was funnier than Joyce imagined and much more horrible than Orwell prefigured. His main character, the laughable Volodymyr Frauenzimmer, works through his excruciating guilt, split hence irreconcilable identity, and obfuscating desire to settle accounts with history. Pondering the question of whether to kill or not to kill the next Russian dictator, Volodymyr transcends the border of the real and enters a realm where infamous political terrorists and their famous victims come together to discuss the self-destructive power of hatred. This book is a cold shower for anybody who still thinks you can change history and passionate encouragement for all those confident that you can do nothing about it.
—Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern
Associate Professor in Jewish History, Northwestern University

Candide meets The Terminator—in the funhouse of history, ethnic prejudice, ethics… and the dysfunctional family. An intellectual thriller (camps and assassins included).
—George G. Grabowicz
Professor of Ukrainian Literature, Harvard University

Alexander Motyl is a master of seduction by the preposterous.
—Myrna Kostash
Writer, Edmonton, Canada


Reviews

July 18, 2011:
Review by Michael Johnson in The American Spectator
http://spectator.org/archives/2011/07/18/a-romp-through-history/


June 2, 2011:
The new Pathway Ukrainian Weekly

http://www.infoukes.com/newpathway/22-2011-Page-7-1.html


May 24, 2011, Ukrainaian Candian TV
Interview with Alexander J. Motyl in Ukrainain:

http://www.youtube.com/kontaktukrainianTV/#p/u/15/UrKYpUe1WPs


April 27, 2011
Review in the Kyiv Post:

The Jew Who Was Ukrainian is a blackly comedic, anti-historical, and absurdist novel about a tortured Jewish-Ukrainian man who struggles vainly to find meaning at the intersection of Hitler’s Holocaust and Stalin’s Gulag. The hero of this preposterous story is Volodymyr Frauenzimmer, a man with a preposterous name and a preposterous past. His Ukrainian mother was a Nazi concentration camp guard and hates Jews. His Jewish father was a Stalinist butcher and hates Ukrainians. Poor Volodymyr doesn’t know how to cope with his dreadful past until he discovers the redeeming power of hatred and resolves to kill the Exceptionally Great Leader of Mother Russia—the fish-eyed Pitoon, a half-Russian, half-German dictator whose name happens to...
Read more: http://www.kyivpost.com/news/opinion/op_ed/detail/102945/


Temporarily Out of Stock

$16.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-1-7 | 181 Pages | In Stock
White As Silver by Rane Arroyo
Červená Barva Press, 2010

This is Rane Arroyo’s eleventh published book of poetry. Additionally, he published a book of fiction (How to Name a Hurricane) and selected plays (Dancing at Funerals). Arroyo has been translated and published internationally; he has also won many awards including the Carl Sandburg Prize in Poetry, the John Ciardi Prize and an Ohio Arts Council Excellence Award, among others. An openly gay, Puerto Rican and Midwestern author, Arroyo’s work has been well received by many constituencies, including the Affrilachian Poets. Arroyo was co-founder and co-publisher of New Sins Press. A creative writing professor at The University of Toledo, Arroyo was named Distinguished University Professor shortly prior to his untimely death on May 7, 2010. He leaves behind a plethora of unpublished works—poetry, plays, versions of memoirs and even a rumored novel.


White As Silver

December, how easily you
dissolve this sad shining day.
It's just dense snowflakes melting
on my expensive boots.

Storm warning—a theater of
cold is on tour from Utah and
I loved there before I knew
the below-the-waist was mine.

I'm my own home. Icy clouds are
eclipses, white as silver. Snowmen
refuse to believe humans are their
creators. Taxis don't know where

Paradise is, should be. I know
that this opaque city will shine.
I was unknown when with you.
Soon, there's tinsel and eggnog.

February 12, 2011
Review by Michael T. Steffen:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-2-9 | 54 Pages | In Stock
Clear Eye Tea by Mary Bonina Clear Eye Tea by Mary Bonina
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Mary Bonina has published poetry, memoir, and fiction in Salamander, Hanging Loose, Gulf Stream, many other journals, and in several anthologies, including Voices of the City from Rutgers University Center for Ethnicity, Culture, and Modern Experience. Winner of Boston Contemporary Authors, a public art project, her poem “Drift” was selected to be inscribed in a granite monolith now permanently installed outside a busy Boston subway station in Jamaica Plain. Bonina is a fellow of the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and is a member serving on the Board of Directors of the Writers’ Room of Boston, Inc. She holds an M.F.A. from the Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.


“Mary Bonina’s Clear Eye Tea celebrates the everyday events in our lives: a father returning from work; family members grown frail; a girl weeping on the train. And yet in her hands, the daily has a miraculous tinge. The sharp vision she was praised for as a child, when she was called “the one with good eyes” who could spot the “tiny spider floating/in the cup of wine” has developed into a kind of x-ray that illuminates the secrets, the motivations, the bare bones inside our common gestures. I closed this book with a feeling of more than happiness, something very close to joy, and I can think of no greater praise.”
—John Skoyles, Poetry Editor, Ploughshares, author of The Situation

“Here is poetry that does what the title of this book suggests: it gives us a careful steeping in the real, and shows us also how hard it is to stay in emotional touch with it. Here is childhood, for example, seen as if one has finally found a way to open a door on what it was really like. Here also is mortal dread and loss, each embraced without flinching, and here too is praise for gentleness and love, neither any less real than the suffering they are interwoven with. Here then is the “clear eye tea” of Mary Bonina’s poetry.”
—Fred Marchant, Author of The Looking House

“Mary Bonina’s poems, written with a strong, authentic voice and a compass-eyed gaze, balance between presence and absence: dirty plastic pretend ivory thing (“Shop of Small Pleasures”); You will hear, too, the dove/its awful sad cry, because/in the rainforest even the sadness/of a dove has more muscle. (“Sorcery”), and between whole and fractured lives: What on earth were they doing with the gun?/They were friends and it was an accident (“Shrine in Cambridge”). Line by line these poems breathe, and it is in this breath the reader’s imagination shares the gifts of revelation, reconciliation, and ultimately, grace.”
—Dzvinia Orlowsky, author of Convertible Night/Flurry of Stones


November 8th, 2010: Interview with Mary Bonina by Lex Schroeder

October, 24, 2010: Review by Rene Schwiesow

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-9-8 | 69 Pages

Temporarily out of stock

Everything Happens Suddenly by Roberta Swann Everything Happens Suddenly by Roberta Swann
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Roberta Swann was program director of the Great Hall at Cooper Union and co-founder of the American Jazz Orchestra. Her poetry and fiction appear in many literary journals. She has taught at the Cooper Union, Indiana University, The New School, Baruch College and the Bennington Writing Workshops.


“Roberta Swann’s poems have a welcome vivacity; they are deft and full of charm and humor. But not entirely. Many of the poems record appealing moments of the natural world and yet sometimes, as she writes, ‘Abandonment is Nature’s way.’ In a poem that begins with recognition of the failing state of her mother, the last stanza begins ‘A bear is at the bird-feeder.’ It is this mixture of light and dark–the embrace of all of it–that is her special gift. Much pleasure lies within the pages of her book.”
—MARY OLIVER

“What’s the secret to Roberta Swann’s funny, inventive and moving poems about the natural world? I think it’s her voice, full of humorous aplomb and unflinching honesty. She knows how to balance sadness with happiness. Just as she moves back and forth from city to country, she can also gracefully cross the dangerous bridge between despair–at a beloved mother’s decline–and joy–at the antics of a big brown bear or a grizzled old squirrel. She’s able to see herself inside of nature, not outside. ‘You'll be stardust. I will too’.”
—MAURA STANTON

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-4-3 | 72 Pages | In Stock
Profane Uncertainties by Luis Raul Calvo Profane Uncertainties by Luis Raúl Calvo
Translated from the Spanish by Flavia Cosma
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Calvo surveys the world and finds Heaven and Hell located close to home — in our own lives — that is to say, in our relationships to others. This significant poet is here brought home for English readers, thanks to the dexterous and careful translations of Flavia Cosma, a distinguished poet herself — in Romanian and English.
—George Elliot Clarke, E. J. Pratt Professor of Canadian Literature, University of Toronto

Luis Raúl Calvo is a profound poet, possessor of a grand lyrical power, preoccupied by the existential limits of the contemporaneous man and by the deepest, implacable layers of his consciousness. All of these are exposed in a concentrated and natural manner, in an original language, with a very personal style which distinguishes this poet from the traditional, run of the mill poetical discourses. Calvo's poetry will never receive the kiss of death, of resignation of enunciation or frivolity, but will soar with the eternal emotion of innocence and dedication.
—Geo Constantinescu, Professor Spanish Literature, University of Craiova, Romania

This book was funded by the SUR Translation Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina who awarded the translater, Flavia Cosma and Červená Barva Press funding for the publication of this book.

October 25, 2010
Review by Zvi A. Sesling
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2010/10/profane-uncertaintiesby-luis-raul-calvo.html
$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-7-4 | 45 Pages | In Stock
Triage by Tam Lin Neville Triage by Tam Lin Neville
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Tam Lin Neville lives and writes in Somerville, MA. Journey Cake, her previous poetry collection, was published by BkMk Press (University of Missouri, Kansas City). She has received a Somerville Arts Council grant. Her poems have appeared in Harvard Review, Mademoiselle, American Poetry Review, Ironwood and Sulfur, among others. With her husband, Bert Stern, she co-edits Off The Grid Press, a press for poets over sixty. She also works for Changing Lives Through Literature, an alternative sentencing program.


Tam Lin Neville’s new book, Triage, reminds us that our cherished notions of freedom, happiness and plenty actually conceal large communities of entrapment, misery and poverty where many are simply left to die – triaged, if you will – in front of our eyes. An observant neighbor, a journalist, and above all, a poet of great skill and heart, Neville speaks for those who cannot speak for themselves. Few poets writing today have the patience and talent to guide us toward such a civilizing compassion.
—Roger Mitchell

Behind this remarkable book is a mind that has long contemplated the humanity of those she meets every day – neighbor, stranger, friend. Yet she speaks from a respectful distance and this enables her to write poems with no self-interest, only clear sight and generosity. Her language is spare, stripped of all aesthetic preening, creating a poetry that is both accurate and visionary.
—Betsy Sholl

Triage is a tough, uncompromising book, but one that’s also big-hearted, despite the sorrow so evident in the title and in many of the individual poems. Written with great economy and precision, the lyric here is not merely a display of skill, but a form of wisdom literature, a site map to help us navigate these difficult times. I hear the voices of Dickinson and Niedecker – stern mentors, indeed. In Neville’s poems their legacies are gracefully and fearlessly served.
—David Wojahn

Just wanted to tell you how much I like your book, Triage. I read it through twice, both times with deep appreciation for the attention your poems demanded, for all their seeming simplicity, and with deep interest in their subject matter. I'm full of admiration and even soul expansion from the achievement of the poems. How spare you are in descriptions of human beings and their plights, how delicately you give us scenes, characters, trajectories of lives that I, for one, have always wanted to turn away from to avoid the deep disturbance I've felt. I love how you order the poems. The book reads like a story. I love your internal rhymes, a soothing, lullaby quality in some of them. I am thrilled at how you ended the book, which lifts it high toward hopefulness in a thin gruel world. Good for you, Tam. Good for us. I hope your publisher enters your book in various contests for 2020 books. Integrity — that's the word I want. Trustworthiness. Not always apparent in poetry. I am nourished by it.
—Sondra Zeidenstein Editor, Chicory Blue Press

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-3-6 | 51 Pages | In Stock
What May Have Been Letters of Jackson Pollock & Dori G by Susan Tepper and Gary Percesepe What May Have Been: Letters of Jackson Pollock & Dori G
by Susan Tepper and Gary Percesepe
Červená Barva Press, 2010

What May Have Been is a novel in letters exchanged between the artist Jackson Pollock and his fictional lover, a young woman called Dori G.

Susan Tepper and Gary Percesepe have created a sexy and luminous love story that takes place sometime during the late 1940's, in that sandy wonderland at the eastern tip of Long Island known as The Hamptons.


Advance Praise for What May Have Been

"In this extraordinary novel, Pollock tells his lover that things like paint and wives are very small in the scheme of things. Gary Percesepe and Susan Tepper show how the great scheme of things is, in fact, in literary art, captured in paint and wives and a Montauk surf and a silky scarf and narrow hips and a cold water flat and a used Ford. Brilliantly conceived, brilliantly executed, this is a stunning book about art and about life."
—Robert Olen Butler, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of
A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain

"The fictional letters between Pollock and an imaginary Dori G come out in a hailstorm of paint flecks, lockets, long looks, kisses, blowing sand. Dori sees Jackson in his distance and his nearing, and his return to her like the visit of one of the Greek gods to his mortal lover, as piercing and as fatal."
—Mary Grimm, author of Left to Themselves and Stealing Time

"How to convey the irresistible pleasures of this novel in letters? The language mimics the slashing, dramatic immediate heroic gestures of abstract expressionism, is an extraordinary act of poetic invention, and tells a sexy and doomed love story."
—James Robison, author of The Illustrator and Rumors

"These two fervent voices exude the splendor and gloom of adulterous love."
—Mark Wisniewski, author of Confessions of a Polish Used Car Salesman


Reviews, Articles, and Interviews

April 18, 2011: Connotation Press
Book Review & Interview with Susan Tepper and Gary Percesepe
http://connotationpress.com/fiction/845-book-review-a-interview-with-susan-tepper-and-gary-percesepe

April 11, 2011: WJFF Radio Interview with Susan Tepper

 

Issue #50 - March 18, 2011 Dan's Papers
By The Book
by Joan Baum

March Minis
What May Have Been: Letters of Jackson Pollock & Dori G (Červená Barva Press), a slim paperback collaboration that grew out of e-mails between two writers who met on the social media site Fictionaut, describes an imaginary love affair carried on mostly by letters (sometimes only a line to a page) between the famous artist and a highly neurotic, self-centered young girl, 17. "Your legs are like white asparagus stalks," Pollock writes when he first sees her in a supermarket amid fruit. Though she says he's "old, old, old,"…
Gary Percesepe writes Dori's letters, Susan Tepper, Jackson's.

Desert News And Telegraph: http://desertnewsandtelegraph.blogspot.com/

January 26, 2011: Listen to Susan Tepper's interview on the Trevor Joe Lennon Radio Show

 

January 19, 2011: Susan Tepper Radio Spot on Trevor Joe Lennon Show
http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=491899158820&comments

January 15, 2011: Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/

What May Have Been: An Interview with Susan Tepper and Gary Percesepe by Steve Almond September 25, 2010: http://www.thenervousbreakdown.com/

"An Appreciation of What May Have Been" by James Robison:
http://www.fictionaut.com/stories/james-robison/an-appreciation-of-what-may-have-been

Fictionaut Blog. September 3, 2010:
http://blog.fictionaut.com/2010/09/03/checking-in-with-what-may-have-been/

Daily s-Press. September 6, 2010: http://dailyspress.blogspot.com/

goodreads: goodreads

$15.00 | ISBN 978-0-9844732-8-1 | 104 Pages

Released May 11, 2010

Live Landscape by Andrey Gritsman Live Landscape by Andrey Gritsman
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Andrey Gritsman is a poet and essayist, born and raised in Russia. He lives in New York City and works as a physician. He has been widely published in Russia, including five collections of poetry. Poems, essays and translations in English have appeared in Manhattan Review, New Orleans Review, Denver Quarterly, Notre Dame Review, Poet Lore, South Carolina Review and many others and were anthologized in Modern Poetry in Translation (UK), in Crossing Centuries (New Generation in Russian Poetry), The Breath of Parted Lips: Voices from the Robert Frost Place and in Stranger at Home: American Poetry with an Accent. Collections of poetry and essays Long Fall was published by Spuyten Duyvil in 2004 and recent poetry collection PISCES by Numina Press. Andrey’s work was nominated for the Pushcart Prize in 2005, 2006 and 2007 and was on the short list for the Joyce Osterweil/PEN American Center Prize in Poetry in 2005. He runs the Intercultural Poetry Series in a popular literary club Cornelia Street Café and edits international poetry magazine INTERPOEZIA.

Cover Art: Natasha Gasteva

Andrey Gritsman is quite literally a groundbreaking poet. From Moscow to New York is a steep distance but Gritsman makes us aware of the threads that link seemingly disparate occasions. Fresh perceptions create new styles and Gritsman’s is more than a synthesis of two cultures: it is an art that probes delusions and pleasures by a poet who has been around some daunting blocks.
—Baron Wormser, author of Good Trembling and many other collections of poetry.

Andrey Gritsman’s poems are unwavering in their honesty, relentless in their assessment of contemporary life, and clear-eyed in their approach to human love and mortality. We instantly recognize the terrain he is negotiating. Perhaps only Gritsman, with his unprejudiced immigrant’s eye, can describe the empty, arid landscape of the American West. These are poems that peer into the abyss behind the official public happiness of American life, the compulsion to be always hopeful, positive and bubbling over with good spirits. That is to say: they are real poems, and make no accommodation with fanciful dreams. Read ‘em, and weep.
—Kurt Brown, poet, editor of several anthologies, founder, Aspen Writers’ Seminar

Gritsman’s poems are tenderness in transit. They fully inhabit their evoked circumstances so that their significance keeps expanding and resonating before the quality of attention given over to them. He so quickly is able to penetrate to the depths in the poems, it is as though working with a large, oiled, sharp shovel while the rest of us are working with miniature dull and rusty spoons. The use of brevity in some of these poems remind me of my beloved Denise Levertov. His poems are “time-flooded” and remind me that whether we look backward or forward in time always the beloved figures are diminishing, disappearing, and the shadow growing from our own foot soles moves among the company of many other shadows. “Constant departure,” as he says it, is our state, and all we can do is stand for our count, make our song, and salute each other.
—Jeanne Marie Beaumont, author of Curious Conduct (BOA Editions)

FOR MY FATHER

After you've been gone,
I've been flying alone back and forth
above the waters and the continents.
Both of us: me here and you there
know too well that this is a waste of time
and space.
I may be flying, looking for you
for the rest of my life
or death, and still never see you.

Nothing can be undone,
and I can't take it.
Nor I can take the fact
that every time I see my close ones, I know,
it may be the last time I see them.

Don't worry about me. While I fly,
an angel in uniform attends me,
gives me some water and bread,
and smiles to me.
She takes care of me
until it's time to get out,
get in line for the luggage
and then to disappear into crowd
which lives on the exhaust,
cyclic persistence
and canned expectations.

The latter is something
I live on myself, expectation
melting slowly into waiting
as I keep on flying
in the space given
for the time being.

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-1-2 | 73 Pages | In Stock

Released March 30, 2010

Jefferson’s New Image Salon by Mark Pawlak Jefferson’s New Image Salon
Matchups & Mashups by Mark Pawlak
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Mark Pawlak is the author of five previous poetry collections of which Official Versions is the most recent. He is also the editor of numerous anthologies, including When We Were Countries, fourth in a series of the “best” poetry and prose by high school-age writers, and Present/Tense: Poets in the World, an anthology of contemporary American political poetry. His work has been translated into German, Polish, and Spanish, and has appeared widely in English in anthologies such as The Best American Poetry, Blood to Remember: American Poets on the Holocaust, and For the Time Being: The Bootstrap Anthology of Poetic Journals and in such literary magazines as New American Writing, Mother Jones, Poetry South, The Saint Ann’s Review, and The World, among many others. He supports his poetry habit by teaching mathematics at UMass Boston, where he is director of Academic Support Programs. He lives in Cambridge.


When will we pass Raphael’s Silver Cloud Lounge and Goya Cosmetics? Do we have time for a quick stop at Unicorn Hair & Nails? Do you ever wonder what’s on the menu at the Café Magritte? Have you put in your holiday order with the butcher at Bosch’s Meat Market? Do you secretly want to sneak into Grendel’s Den or buy the latest discount item from Golem Sales? This is America, and, as Mark Pawlak makes amply evident, it just keeps getting stranger and stranger. If you are trying to get to Vampire Manor or need the phone number of Sasquatch Taxidermy, this is the only accurate guidebook available today.
—John Yau

In Jefferson’s New Image Salon, Mark Pawlak transforms a one-trick pony into a circus of surprising yokings, which on further inspection turn out to be not only surreal—Shylock’s Hair Designs, Onan Gasoline Engines—but poetic and real. The preposterous, often hilarious names of American businesses Pawlak found in doing his mixing and matching make Edsel seem a great name for an automobile.
—Charles North, author of Complete Lineups

Cover Art: “Coda,” Digital Collage by Daniel Y. Harris, www.danielyharris.com

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9844732-0-5 | 32 Pages | In Stock

Released December 31th, 2009

They're Dropping Bombs Not Ham Sandwiches by Michael Nash They're Dropping Bombs Not Ham Sandwiches
A play by Michael Nash
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Michael Nash, originally from Hampshire, has written several works for the stage including ‘Public Heroes Private Friends,’ and ‘Signs of Fire,’ a musical about the last year in the life of Van Gogh. Nash has been employed as a writer, a teacher of Drama and English, a publisher, and all around artist. His interests include cooking, computing, and travel, especially to Turkey and Istanbul, where Nash received a degree from Istanbul University. Involved in over twenty stage productions, onstage and off, Nash has been an active participant appearing in both amateur and professional productions including ‘Under Milkwood,’ ‘A Man for All Seasons,’ and ‘The Pajama Game.’ ‘They’re Dropping Bombs Not Ham Sandwiches’ takes place in a hospital corridor and is a dialogue between a WWII veteran and a young man embroiled in the troubles of Northern Ireland. This is Nash’s tenth completed work for the stage. Michael Nash currently resides in Middlesbrough.


They’re Dropping Bombs Not Ham Sandwiches, set not so very long ago, between a World War II veteran and a youth caught up in the troubles of Northern Ireland. The play takes place in a hospital corridor and the story illustrates the Second World War through flashbacks.

It is a heart-rending awareness of World War II as seen through the eyes of an elderly hospital patient in 1989. His recollections are shared with a youth who is, as the play eventually reveals, a victim of a terrorist bomb attack in Northern Ireland. Scenes from the war years are illustrated by poetry, dialogue, and action in fantasy sequences, and enacted by the two central characters and three of the hospital staff.

$14.00 | ISBN: 978-0-578-00416-7 | 90 Pages | In Stock

Released December 16th, 2009

Treating A Sick Animal Flash and Micro Fictions by Timothy Gager Treating A Sick Animal Flash and Micro Fictions
by Timothy Gager
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Timothy Gager is the author of four books of poetry. "Treating a Sick Animal" is his fourth book of fiction. He hosts the Dire Literary Series in Cambridge, Massachusetts every month and is the co-founder (with Doug Holder) of the Somerville News Writers Festival.

Timothy is the current fiction editor of The Wilderness House Literary Review, the founding co-editor of The Heat City Literary Review and has edited the book, "Out of the Blue Writers Unite: A Book of Poetry and Prose" from the Out of the Blue Art Gallery.

A graduate of the University of Delaware, Timothy lives on www.timothygager.com and is employed as a social worker.


Timothy Gager’s stories came at us like a brisk punch to the heart. His characters are profane and tender, dazed and confused, out of work and short on options. And yet they remain stubbornly vibrant, these damaged children of Bukowski, illuminated by their desires and inflamed by unreasonable hopes.
-Steve Almond, author of The Evil B.B. Chow, Candy Freak, and Not That You Asked

This book is a trip-- or actually it is 40-plus quick and vivid trips into Timothy Gager’s untamed fictional terrain. Sometimes surreal, sometimes all-too-real, these Flash Fictions always surprise. Fasten your readerly seatbelt, choose your own adventure and enjoy the wild rides.
-Elizabeth Searle, author of Celebrities In Disgrace and Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera

Timothy Gager’s flash fictions are full of flashes of insight into the great human predicament.
-Michael Kimball, author of Dear Everybody

Timothy Gager is a compelling and unforgettable writer. These bold and witty little stories limn the peculiarities, and sometimes alarming behavior, of our human species.
-John Sheppard, author of Small Town Punk

As good an orator you’ll find, Timothy Gager flashes a gleam in the eyes while carrying a slouch in the shoulders. His fiction connects to the giggling man as well as it does to the sad man.
-Matt DiGangi, editor, publisher and founder of Thieves Jargon

$15.00 | ISBN 978-0-578-04207-7 | 140 Pages | In Stock

Released December 15th, 2009

Van Gogh's Ear by Pamela L. Laskin Van Gogh's Ear by Pamela L. Laskin
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Pamela L. Laskin, a teacher, writer, cyclist, swimmer and avid reader, has had many poems, short stories and children's stories published in journals and magazines. She is a lecturer in the English Department at The City College, where she directs The Poetry Outreach Center. Central Station, her first book of poetry, was the winner of the Millennium Poetry Prize. Remembering Fireflies, her second collection, was published by Plain View Press, and Ghosts, Goblins, Gods and Geodes, her third collection, was published by World Audience Press. In 2009, Plain View Press published her fourth collection, Secrets of Sheets. Three poetry chapbooks, five picture books and two young adult novels have been published as well. She edited a collection of original fairy tales, The Heroic Young Woman, published by Clique Calm Books. She lives in Brooklyn, New York with her husband, Ira, while her children, Craig and Samantha, are away at school completing their degrees.


Pamela Laskin is equally able to grasp the big picture -- “born/ out of millions of years/ of old thumbs and cortexes” -- as well as the small, luminous detail. She writes with vivid immediacy about the people and places around her, so that each poem, “Each bead is like the cell of a body/ passing through a busy street/ on a quiet day.” It is a pleasure to spend time with and have one’s senses sharpened by this book.
-Elaine Equi

Pamela Laskin’s new poems move richly and swiftly through memory and presence, through family, romance, friendship, and art, through Brooklyn and the rest of the world. They are passionate, quiet, thoughtful, intelligent. I want to say there is something modest about them, but it’s the modesty of someone who knows she knows and will lift the screen for a second if only to see if you can figure it out. Van Gogh’s Ear is a fine and generous collection.
-Mark Statman

In a Glass Ball

Clouds stuck in the sky
summer has evaporated
anorexic trees,
children gone from the streets.

Soon I will be snowed under
as I am, perhaps, already
staring out the window

like the woman trapped in a glass ball
which people turn over, indiscriminately
watching the tiny flakes
scatter haphazardly

observing
the unsettling appearance
of a woman
going nowhere.

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-578-04084-4 | 74 Pages | In Stock

Released October 24th, 2009

Pentakomo Cyprus by Irene Koronas Pentakomo Cyprus by Irene Koronas
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Irene Koronas is the poetry editor for the Wilderness House Literary Review and Ibbetson Street Press. She is the author of self portrait drawn from many (Ibbestson Street Press, 2007). She also has several chapbook publications, the latest being, Zero Boundaries (Cervena Barva Press, 2008). Irene’s work has been widely published in numerous literary journals including Lummox, Free Verse, Posey, Arcanam Café, Spearhead, Index poetry, Unblog, Haiku Hut, Lynx and the anthologies Bagels with the Bards and WHLR Anthology, 2006. Articles written about Irene have appeared in The Boston Globe, What’s Up With Your Words, Sedaca, The Alewife, Spare Change, The Somerville News, and the Cambridge Chronicle.


These poems of beauty and strength unfold one into another as Irene weaves an engaging, thoughtful cacophony of experiences lived out over six weeks in Cyprus. I was drawn into a visual arrangement of days by an extraordinarily gifted communicator. I couldn't put this book down until I lived through all the wonder and discovery on display.
-C K Johns, author

Irene Koronas writes with the confidence of a life-long poet. She knows the ground on which she stands. With tenderness and honesty she takes her readers to the churches, kitchen, and dusty paths of her ancestral village. Orange trumpet flowers, rusty rocks, pregnant dogs, figs, saints, kneaded dough, peacocks, icons, olive oil and old women pepper the pages of Irene’s poetry painting a generous, complex, vibrant picture of Irene’s recollections of six weeks in Cyprus. At its heart, this is a love story. It traces the passion, ambivalence, and longing of desires that cannot be resolved simply. In recounting her journey, Irene invites us to look for the remains of our own histories, our own relinquished passions.
-Jennifer Peace, Ph.D.

In, Pentakomo Cyprus, Koronas finds her way through each day, image by image, sound by discrete sound, giving us the crystalline collection of things, our mixed media realities. The collection is a mobile of emotions made small and delicate or large and brusque. It is this honesty that lets the reader into a life that is wondrously and marvelously made, tiny step by tiny step, great leap by great leap.
-Afaa Michael Weaver

$15.00 | ISBN 978-0-578-02262-8 | 50 Pages | In Stock

Released June 12th, 2009

Pretty Little Lies by W. R. Mayo Pretty Little Lies
Ten Generations Of Southern Hypocrisy by W. R. Mayo
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Pretty Little Lies, as told from the perspective of a member of the southern Mayo clan, reads like a gothic novel spanning centuries. In a take no prisoners accounting. W. R. Mayo's memoir is a serious undertaking that makes for fascinating reading. Though not from an old southern family, I, for one recognize much of what we all carry in our DNA.
- Susan Tepper, author of DEER

In his biting family memoir, Pretty Little Lies, W. R. Mayo courageously puts a dagger into the heart of the southern plantation myth. By unflinchingly facing his own dysfunctional past, Mayo gives the romantic, idealized version of ante- and post-bellum life below the Mason-Dixon Line a well-deserved paddling. In moving prose, he reveals the underbelly of the "big house"- a way of life created and sustained by traffic in human slavery and one reliant upon the manipulation, or far worse, of the land and those who lived and toiled upon it. Pretty Little Lies is a must read for anyone looking to see past the mythology of the Old South.
- J. B. Hogan, author

Unflinching. Revealing. In this exhaustively researched family history, Mayo charts the rise of a Southern family from its roots in England to the founding of a plantation in Southeastern Arkansas in the middle of the nineteenth century. Through the degradations of the Civil War, two world wars, and countless family conflicts still raging to this day, Mayo lays bare the mythology of Southern "Nobility." He frankly examines the treatment of slaves by his family which led to "the other Mayos," a family of blacks descended from these slaves, and describes the uncompromising natures of his progenitors. From his mother who never apologized for anything, considering it a waste of time to his racist, domineering father, Mayo chronicles the infighting, manipulation, and xenophobia prevalent in his family's past. Mayo digs to the core to face head-on not only the lies, exaggerations and conscious-salving stories of "pride" passed down within his family, but also to uncover the real story of Southern history. As Faulkner said, "The past is never dead. In fact, it's not even past." Mayo's past is certainly not dead, though this book is an attempt to put a stake through it's heart.
- C. L. Bledsoe, author of Anthem, Riceland and editor for Ghoti Magazine

$15.95 | ISBN 978-0-9773695-4-0 | 211 Pages

Released June 12th, 2009

Anthem by CL Bledsoe Anthem poems by CL Bledsoe
Červená Barva Press, 2009

CL Bledsoe has published work in over 200 journals and anthologies, including The Cimarron Review, Nimrod and The Arkansas Review. Winner of the Blue Collar Review's Working People's Poetry Contest, he is also a 3-time Pushcart Prize nominee. He is an editor for Ghoti Magazine. http://www.ghotimag.com and the author of a chapbook entitled_______(Want/Need)

CL Bledsoe's Anthem is succinct, shrewd and contemporary. Bledsoe is a modern-age poet with the unique ability to bring the reader smack into the moment with him ... Anthem's poems are no exception. Often confessional, occasionally biting, Bledsoe proves once again that he is the poet for generation X, Y and whatever lies beyond.
-Patricia Gomes, editor of Adagio Verse Quarterly and poetry moderator of iVillage's Poet's Workshop

Fresh, funny, hip, anarchic, jaded, secretly hopeful, angry, wry, laid-back: to read CL Bledsoe's Anthem is to enter a world that may make you twitch - but will surely help you keep on keeping on. These songs of punked-out innocence stage-strut across the page, even when they claim they're simply slacking on the couch. Join Frog and Death and the absinthe squirrels on a savvy, consciousness-jolting road-trip through the landscape of right now. I loved this smart and artful book. I bet you will to. Open it. Find out.
-Jeanne Larsen, winner of the AWP poetry book award

$15.00 | ISBN 978-0-615-25796-9 | 65 Pages | Temporarily Out of Stock

 

Just released June 12th, 2009

Anezka Ceska (Agnes of Bohemia) by Jaromir Horec Anezka Ceska by Jaromir Horec
Translated into English by Jana Morávková Kiely as Agnes of Bohemia
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Jaromir Horec was born on December 18, 1921 in Chust, in Sub-Carpathian Ruthenia, which in 1919, at the treaty of Versailles, had voted to become part of the newly formed Czechoslovak Republic with an enlightened, freely elected government led by the humanist philosopher, Tomas Garrigue Masaryk.

Throughout the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia, Jaromír Hoec was active in the underground anti-Nazi youth movement. After World War II, Sub-Carpathian Ruthenia was not returned to Czechoslovakia but was annexed by Stalin to the Soviet Union. Thus Horec, living in Prague, became an expatriate in his own country. He was a prolific poet, who was not allowed to publish for two periods of twenty years each: 1948-1966 and 1969-1989.

In 1977, he signed Charter 77 and two years later, he founded the Czech underground press Ceska Expedice for which he was imprisoned in 1981. His many works of poetry, include Anezka Ceska, and Chleb Na Stole, as well as many other publications, such as Why I Am Not a Communist and Sub-Carpathian Ruthenia-an Unknown land have been coming out only since 1989.

$15.00 | ISBN 978-0-578-02262-8 | 54 Pages | In Stock

 

Grief Hut by Nancy Mitchell Grief Hut by Nancy Mitchell
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Nancy Mitchell is the author of The Near Surround (Four Way Books, 2002) and her poems have appeared in Agni, Poetry Daily, Salt Hill Journal, Great River Review, and are anthologized in Last Call by Sarabande Books. She has received an Artist in the Schools grant for Virginia, and residency fellowships from the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in Amherst, Virginia and in Auvillar, France. Mitchell teaches in the English Department at Salisbury University, Maryland, and has taught in the Stonecoast MFA program in Maine. She resides in Salisbury, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, with her husband John Ebert, a filmmaker.

The Grief Hut stands on an imaginary beach, where women help each other to give birth to their griefs: the birth of sorrows here is given words with a growing power, intensity, and wisdom, a wisdom still wired to its human love and memory.
-Jean Valentine

Mitchell is blessed with a vivid--and haunting--memory--of particulars, the things of our past, and of the more complex feelings the things generate. She refuses nothing, she is deadly accurate, yet she sings. We should read her.
-Gerald Stern

The poems in Nancy Mitchell's book Grief Hut are so lucidly and deeply felt that they cut directly to the bone of the experiences they are recounting. This is a true and an incredibly beautiful book.
-Malena Mörling

Her descriptions of people, the details and detritus of their lives are studied and stunning. May we hear more from this talented poet.
-Doug Holder/Ibbetson Street Press

Review of Grief Hut:
http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/cr/bookreviews/griefhut.html

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-615-25797-6 | 66 Pages | In Stock

 

The Curvature of Blue by Lucille Lang Day The Curvature of Blue by Lucille Lang Day
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Description: The Curvature of Blue traverses an arc from the personal to the social and historical to the cosmic and philosophical. As a scientist and poet, Lucille Lang Day goes beyond celebration of the natural world to explore the intersections of science, nature, and human experience, and to meld scientific accuracy with intuition and emotional response. Whether writing about jellyfish, war, or her own experience, she draws attention to important questions and inspires us to think more deeply about what it means to be human and how our choices affect the planet Earth.


"In Lucille Lang Day's poems, stunning transformations of language cross the placenta barrier between the worlds of science and human emotion. She thinks and feels in color, enabling us to inhabit the complexity of the universe-as experienced at breakfast with a lover, in the wild with caribou, or in meditations on acts of historical horror-all made radiant by her lyric gifts and wisdom."
-Teresa Cader

"Intelligence enjoying itself, awareness at play, attentiveness dancing through life's minefields: smiling at itself in its new black car ("Nor have I shunned onyx jewelry. That would be foolish"), Lucille Lang Day will at first glance make you smile and smile again. Then, with her scientist's mind, her woman's heart, her pain at injustice and evil, and her poet's eye and ear, she will carry you "through the mountains and canyons of space-time" to a fuller humanity. The Curvature of Blue is a wonderful book and I feel lucky to have read it"
-Alicia Ostriker

"Is the sky blue? Day's poems paint it a hundred different ways, full of geometry and change, structure and feeling, as plangent as a sunset, as secret as an electromagnetic field. Divine love holds the physical parts together, even as human love and its marvelous stories are the substance of our lives. Here are witty, intelligent, affectionate poems making grand, skeptical comparisons and painting us and our shadows in brilliant colors--perfect poems for our time."
-F.D.Reeve

$15.00 | ISBN 978-0-692-00181-3 | 90 Pages | In Stock

 

Sarasota VII by Lo Galluccio Sarasota VII by Lo Galluccio
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Reading Sarasota VII is like watching, no staging, a play that happens to be written in poetry. By playing with structure, Galluccio has done something akin to Calvino where the structure itself is a character and a part of the plot, and you're right in the thick of it. You need to read it.
Ralph-Michael Chiaia, poet, Ten Poems & Ampersands, Coatlism Press.

Passionate, poignant and concise, Lo Galluccio's Sarasota VII presents us with a story of loss and raw delinquent energy, woven into a great surreal web of metaphors and magic. Crafted with care and lucid honesty, this poetic prose offers its readers an intense vision of real and imaginary journeys across universal and interior landscapes. "We write as if it matters, so it does. We love as if it matters, so it does," declares the author.
Flavia Cosma, poet of Gothic Calligraphy and Season of Love

As in the heavens, there is much beauty and much destruction, where even light cannot escape black holes, and "nothing's pure and nothing's stable." Galluccio takes the reader on a journey from a hotel room in Florida into the expansive cosmos of the soul, revealing a woman caught up between passion and intellect, raging to be free while seeking to merge; loving, losing, dominating and submitting in her evolution to reconnect and be whole.
Karen Bowles, Publisher Luciole Press

So this is what Anne Boleyn whispered to the men who took her head—both her husband and her executioner—so this is what the henchman replied; for nowhere has sinner and saint been so exquisitely linked than in Lo Galluccio’s Sarasota VII. As the curtain parts, it is not polar opposites that are revealed but a single conjoined child. Traversing Sarasota VII (it has less in common with reading, more so the navigation to heaven or the surrender into hell) is like giving definition to the word ‘passion.’ This is how to say profoundly simple words with often incomprehensible meanings: Love. Desire. Hate. Birth. Destruction. And who hasn’t attempted this— to grasp the single rose in the pit of thorns. And who hasn’t, on occasion, failed and been banished? But Lo’s beautiful, prophetic prose lulls us, even as we burn, and she tells us to “Fossilize the monster” and “Tend our rings like vain kings.” She is right. We must. For something so terrifyingly beautiful should, forever, be.
Coleen T. Houlihan

$12.00 | ISBN 978-0-615-26369-4 | 57 Pages | In Stock

 

Bird Scarer by Glenn Sheldon
Červená Barva Press, 2008

MARTHA COLLINS-Structurally and emotionally expansive, Bird Scarer covers more territory than most first books. Beginning as a displaced Bostonian who finds himself in Chicago, where a "terrible blankness fills my eye," Sheldon next moves into a more abstract landscape, where he finds a "permanent address" that is both actual and mental. Finally, he opens his emotional eye to the variety and vibrancy of Latin America, where his travels become the metaphorical basis for a "Geography of Desire." Though often playful, the book is carefully observant and edgily serious: "I'm alert," the poet says, "like a bus rider / with a drunk driver making up / the names of the streets." Metaphors like this, usually emerging from setting, as well as less easily defined conceits ("The anarchists' picnic is / a disaster: Where? Why? When?"), turn these well-grounded poems into delightfully non-linear narratives that keep the reader as alert as the poet.

SUSAN AZAR PORTERFIELD-I am impressed by Sheldon's form. Always the stanza, always very regular, tercets or quatrains, etc., which seems to suggest a kind of control as does his use of short lines as well as short sentences. It suggests a kind of control and even terseness, but what I like is his unexpected bloom or rush of thought and/or feeling that really comes through. In other words, he gets us to ride on this seemingly tidy little train, but then the journey takes us on a wilder ride than we anticipated. I like the surprise of that. I also like what I perceive to be his tone and voice. Quiet, a bit sardonic, but also heavily emotional, Bird Scarer is lovely.

JIM DANIELS-Bird Scarer is an impressive collection of poems. The voice is wise and mature. The structure of the book both clear and sophisticated. One of the things I look for in a book of poetry is an accumulation of momentum from beginning to end, and I found that here. The book creates interesting tensions in terms of place-the links between physical places and emotional landscapes are explored in all their complexities. Sheldon has a fresh voice-quirky and disarming, frank and witty. And always precise. I was struck by the consistent use of tight, packed language, and his careful use of the poetic line. I love the understated humor in many of the poems, and how he uses form to reinforce that humor. The depth and tonal richness of the comparisons seem effortless and natural, yet carry enormous weight in these poems. They roll through these poems, one after another, creating surprise, discovery, insight, throughout. And fun.

LUIS URREA-Glen Sheldon's earlier poetry is certainly filled with promise. We find a full voice in play. Perhaps the poems are shaded by his expertise in Thomas McGrath. Still, this influence does not in any way dull the poems' brio. It is as an American poet that Glenn Sheldon will ultimately be remembered (and revered). He will have a major career as a poet, as Bird Scarer reveals his full maturity and trajectory.

$14.00 | ISBN: 9780615171678 | 60 Pages | In Stock: 20

 

A Careful Scattering by Philip E. Burnham, Jr.
With illustrations by Louise and Elizabeth Burnham
Červená Barva Press, 2007

Each year, for the forty-two Christmases of our married life, my wife, Louise Hassel Burnham, illustrated the poems I wrote to celebrate the festival season of the years’ ending and beginning, the Solstice, Christmas, and New Year. Her illustrations were in a variety of media: line drawings, block prints (both wood and vegetable), collage and paint. Many of the drawings represent views of our house in Newton, Massachusetts, including such details as the front door, a mirror in the hall, the fireplace. Others include the names and places of family and friends woven into trees. Louise’s final card, from 2001, is a gathering up of many earlier cards. While the original intent of these cards was to celebrate a single year, together they sum up our lives over four decades. We discussed their publication before her death, and it was she who chose the title, “A Careful Scattering.” In their publication I want to remember our partnership, and to dedicate this book to her memory with love.

$16.95 | ISBN 978-1-4357-0003-1 | 98 Pages | In Stock: 30

 

The Season of Love by Flavia Cosma The Season of Love by Flavia Cosma
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Once again in The Season of Love, Flavia Cosma offers us those momentary glimpses and sensations briefly felt and viewed which hide and yet reveal the testament of life. Through the transient sensations of reality, the poet lures her readership deep into the mystic world of her eternity. Each poem serves to lead the reader through the pain, suffering and loneliness of life while searching for truth's hidden mysteries which serve to make life meaningful and beautiful, yet remain to be discovered in that continual renewal and rebirth of life.
David Mills, poet and critic
Toronto, Canada


One of prevailing themes in Flavia Cosma's poetry is love, but not as a banal, run-of-the mill experience. Instead, it has the elemental intensity of natural phenomena, which best picture both the breakdown of feelings and the undying hope. And that's where the poet places her wise optimism.
Dr. Irena Harasimowicz-Zarzecka
PHD Philology, University of Bucharest, Romania
Toronto, Canada

Excerpt from the Introduction:

"...Cosma employs

No such wasteful rhetoric. Her poetry—

Analytical, elegant, eloquent—

Is as superb as poetry demands.

Her devotion delights; her lines instruct.

The Season of Love is a fresh gospel,

Skewering our pretensions forcefully.

Its lush richness of imagination,

Singing through Cosma’s and Siedlecki’s English,

Is compelling and a consummation,

Marrying music and morality."

George Elliott Clarke
E.J. Pratt Professor of Canadian Literature
University of Toronto
Laureate, 2001 Governor-General’s Award for Poetry

Flavia Cosma is an award winning Romanian-born Canadian poet, author and translator. She has published thirteen books of poetry, a novel, a travel memoir and three books for children. Her book, 47 Poems, (Texas Tech Press) received the ALTA Richard Wilbur Poetry in Translation Prize. Červená Barva Press published her chapbook, Gothic Calligraphy and will be publishing her newest collection, Songs at the Aegean Sea.

$15.00 | ISBN: 978-0-615-20097-2 | 89 Pages | In Stock

 

The Man in the Booth in the Midtown Tunnel by Doug Holder
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Order online at Lulu.com: http://www.lulu.com/content/2651312

For years that image of the man in a small plastic booth in the fume-filled Midtown Tunnel that connects Queens to Manhattan in NYC haunted me. As a kid traveling into the city from the sheltered, well-manicured lawns of Long Island to the enigmatic, cosmopolitan world of Manhattan, I couldn't help but wonder about that blue- uniformed lone figure pacing the perimeter of his plastic cage. I think he represented to some extent my fear of the world outside the comforts of my family, and the staid, small town I lived in, Rockville Centre.

I have always admired writers like the New Yorker's Joseph Mitchell, who wrote about the outsiders, the denizens of the old Bowery, the ner-do-wells, the poseurs, the dandies, and the stumblebums, who make the city a both fascinating and frightened place. I always wondered as a kid if I would wind up in the middle of a metaphorical tunnel, a man in a cage, looking for the light. And I guess to some extent we all do in one-way or the other, whether we like it or not.

So I thought this image would be a perfect focal point for my poetry collection, a sort of "Spoon River Anthology" that would consist of character studies of the many men and women I have met, watched and imagined in my time across this stage. I include myself in this collection, because I have always identified with that man and I see his ghost wherever I roam.
Doug Holder


"I am enjoying The Man in the Booth in the Midtown Tunnel -- perfect poems, particularly in that ambiance."
-Dan Tobin, Chairman, Writing and Publishing Program at Emerson College

"Aside from being the founder, publisher, and co-editor of the prestigious and influential Ibbetson Street Press, Doug Holder writes poetry with a passion and insight that deserves prestige and influence all its own."
S. Craig Renfoe, Jr., Main Street Rag

"Holder's work is rich with textual imagery… a master poet who sees the world clearly and shares that vision generously with readers.
Laurel Johnson, Midwest Book Review

"A great poet and a Boston legend."
Joe Gouveia, host of "Poet's Corner," Provincetown radio

"I don't think I send you kudos enough because I take your magical perceptions of the ordinary, your unique take on the everyday, as something you do time and time again always in surprising ways.... from toilet to pay phones, to the fluid connection to all things human is utterly Doug Holder and there isn't anyone out there remotely doing what you do so beautifully...so dryly and always with human regard."
Linda Larson, former editor-in-chief of Spare Change News

Now available as a talking book for the blind:
http://webopac.klas.com/id1aopac/title/summary.jsf;jsessionid=feeaf4946520e01dff3aa80219f9?id=142445757.9032

Order online at Lulu.com: http://www.lulu.com/content/2651312

$13.00 | ISBN: 9780979531361 | 72 Pages

 

Chapbooks

March 31, 2014:
The Art of Waving by Tim Suermondt

The Art of Waving by Tim Suermondt The Art of Waving by Tim Suermondt
Červená Barva Press, 2014

Tim Suermondt is the author of two full-length collections: TRYING TO HELP THE ELEPHANT MAN DANCE (The Backwaters Press, 2007) and JUST BEAUTIFUL from New York Quarterly Books, 2010. He has published poems in Poetry, The Georgia Review, Blackbird, Able Muse, Prairie Schooner, PANK, Bellevue Literary Review and Stand Magazine (U.K.) and has poems forthcoming in Gargoyle, A Narrow Fellow and Plume Poetry Journal among others. After many years in Queens and Brooklyn, he has moved to Cambridge with his wife, the poet Pui Ying Wong.


"Tim Suermondt's poems in this new collection are open, friendly and inviting, in "the voice of our familiarity," but always with a profound or humorous twist. He is devoted "to a bravery found only in the details," to the "the raspberries and the ball games," or his wife "in a strange and beautiful hat," as well as to the dreams, disappointments and possibilities of everyday existence. Not for him the modish pessimism and linguistic difficulties of much of contemporary poetry. "When my wife puts on some Schubert," he says, "I'm sure the world will never end/ and neither will we." Here is a poet who communicates directly and has some hope for us. The apparent simplicity and genial humor of these marvelous poems are grounded in an artful subtlety that reflects the way life really is."
—Norman Stock

Cover Art: "Skull in a Landscape" (1946) by Edward Burra

$7.00 | 28 Pages | In Stock

December 10, 2013:
Incompetent Translations and Inept Haiku by Bill Yarrow

Incompetent Translations and Inept Haiku by Bill Yarrow Incompetent Translations and Inept Haiku by Bill Yarrow
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Bill Yarrow is a Professor of English at Joliet Junior College where he teaches creative writing, Shakespeare, and film. He is the author of Pointed Sentences (BlazeVOX, 2012) His work has appeared in many print and online journals including PANK, Poetry International, Thrush, DIAGRAM, Contrary, and RHINO.


"Incompetent Translations and Inept Haiku is a masterfully competent and original course in comparative poetics, an erudite inside joke that will make you laugh out loud. Hilarious and apt send-ups of Whitman, Rimbaud, Lermontov, Yeats, and Bishop and Yarrow’s own poetic voice make this literary tour a tour de force—funny, moving, and unique."
—Larissa Shmailo, In Paran

"With brilliant wit and deadpan humor, Bill Yarrow captures our ripe imperfections and absurd beauty. This is a collection to be read over and over. Hilarious, unflinching, and right on the mark!"
—Meg Tuite, Bound by Blue


Bonnie ZoBell recommends Incompetent Translations and Inept Haiku in The Doctor T. J. Eckleburg Review:
http://thedoctortjeckleburgreview.com/2014/03/31/eckleburg-book-club-the-whack-job-girls-by-bonnie-zobell/

$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9910091-1-4 | 45 Pages | In Stock

September 12, 2013: Dead Letters by JP Reese

Dead Letters by JP Reese Dead Letters by JP Reese
Červená Barva Press, 2013

JP Reese earned an MFA from The University of Memphis. Her poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, book reviews, and writer interviews have been published or are forthcoming in many online and print journals such as Metazen, Blue Fifth Review, A Baker's Dozen: Thirteen Extraordinary Things, and The Pinch. Reese is Associate Poetry Editor for Connotation Press: An Online Artifact, www.connotationpress.com, and Guest Fiction Editor for Scissors and Spackle. Reese's poetry chapbook Final Notes was published by Naked Mannekin Press in 2012. Reese's flash fiction has won the Patricia McFarland Memorial Prize and her poetry has won The Graduate School Creative Writing Award from The University of Memphis. Her published work can be read at Entropy: A Measure of Uncertainty, jpreesetoo.wordpress.com. Reese lives and works in Texas.


"In the new collection Dead Letters, the music of JP Reese's poetry never strikes a false note. The voice in her writing is always unmistakable, genuine, and penetrating. These poems – and you will keep them close to you – serve as maps for journeys over dark and grieving landscapes. This is a strong poetry that promises and delivers a place, finally, of human faith, of hope under 'the arid bone of flowered stars'."
—Sam Rasnake, poet and author of Inside a Broken Clock from Finishing Line Press.

"There is a sort of formal antiquity and modern lyricism at play in JP Reese's Dead Letters—lovers and family, mythology, allusion, and everyday moments so minute that it is only the persistent ache a reader experiences that alerts her of her own transport elsewhere. Reese's poetry is subtle that way. And powerful. A departure."
—Heather Fowler, poet and author of the new short story collection This Time While We’re Awake from Aqueous Books.


Midnight, 1960

The lamp spreads its yellow halo
over my mother's dark curls.
Smoke swirls around her face
as she reads, a tea pot in its cozy,
rose-painted cup and saucer near.
Pall Mall butts lie discarded
in the ashtray, tipped with Avon's
latest red. Unthinking,
she raises delicate fingers
to her pink tongue, dabs a sliver
of tobacco from its tip. Never
taking her eyes from the book
cradled in her lap, she lives
another life. My father
sleeps, rooms away, unaware
of the change taking place
in the cooling, midnight air.


Reviews:

Your Own Back Yard ~ Writing and Art ~ Michael Gillan Maxwell: http://michaelgillanmaxwell.com/2014/03/07/book-review-dead-letters-jp-reese-2013-cervena-barva-press/

$7.00 | 33 Pages |In Stock

June 29, 2013:
This is Not a Situation in Which You Should Remain Calm by Michelle Reale

This is Not a Situation in Which You Should Remain Calm by Michelle Reale This is Not a Situation in Which You Should Remain Calm
by Michelle Reale
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Michelle Reale is an academic librarian on faculty at Arcadia University in the suburbs of Philadelphia. Her work has appeared in a wide variety of publications both in print and online, including Nano Fiction, Smokelong Quarterly, Pank, Gargoyle, The Pedestal, elimae, JMWW and others. Her work was included in Dzanc’s 2011 Best of the Web Anthology. She is the author of four collections of short fiction and prose poems. She has been twice nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She blogs on immigration and Migration and Social Justice in the Sicilian context at www.sempresicilia.wordpress.com

Cover Photo: Isabella Reale


"Michelle Messina Reale's poems evoke a deep confessional visitation between the connecting North African landscape and Southern Italian Etruscan bloodlines. She has taken the sparse stones found among the terrain’s ruins and placed them one by one, each carefully aligned in unique prosaic consciousnesses that offer new and alluring formations of the old. Her rhythms are rough in prose, often at the edge as a stone cut at various angles, yet continuous and steadfast. The sensation of the hard and quick gallop of a horse through this horizon of remains and longing is heard. The fortitude of trudging onward, of seeing ruinous sights combined with delicious heated passions, leave the reader sweltering and swollen, understanding the validity of bruises."
—Sonia Di Placido, author of, Exultation in Cadmium Red

"In the title poem Michelle Reale, This is Not a Situation in Which You Should Remain Calm writes: Breathed it in to my pulsating lungs. You will want to breathe in to your pulsating lungs each beautifully crafted poem in this chapbook. You connect with the speaker of these poems on many levels and are drawn into each poem, I found myself holding my breath many times while reading this collection of achingly beautiful poems that encompass the human condition and all that it entails."
—Helen Vitoria, Poetry Editor, Thrush Poetry Journal

"Michelle Reale's poems are imbued in the "now" as much as they are journeys to the long-gone world of our ancestors. The stories she paints are harrowing and touching: alive as lizards and intoxicating as wild flowers. There is an exquisite touch to them: the robust flavor of wine, the taste of the nibbled food and the omnipresent homage to Sicilian religiosity. The beauty of this collection’s landscapes and soulscapes left me yearning for more."
—Alessandra Bava, Author of Guerilla Blues


This is Not a Situation in Which You Should Remain Calm

We held hands until the intersection. He dropped his first. I pulled
my coat around me tight, for something to do, the buttons long
gone. My breasts were sore and I shuddered. Don't do that, he said.
He pointed with his head to the ATM machine across the street
from where we stood. Make it enough this time, he said. I hurried
across the street. I heard him greet some men in the street. The
keffiyeh's they wore waved like flags in the wind. They spoke
guttural and urgent. I could hear them over the vibrating traffic, cars
negotiating difficult turns. I stood with my coat open and the wind
ripping a gaping hole through me. I had the money in my hand. He
waved off his friends and came to me. He stood outside the market.
I chose some meat in a plastic package, pink tomatoes small and
premature, grown somewhere far from where we found ourselves.
There was a name for this in my language, but I forgot what it was.
At home I fried the meat. I sliced the tomatoes, cut my finger and
sucked the blood. He made a face, called me simple. Picked his
teeth right in front of me and I thought of what my father might say.
He stared at me, his face softening by degrees. I pulled down the
neck of my blouse, revealing my bruised breasts. Purple and green
and yellow flowers bloomed like a night flower. He set his toothpick
down. It wasn't me, he said. His coffee boiled over on the stove. I
smelled the scorch. Breathed it in to my pulsating lungs. Salvaged
what was left. Served it the way he'd become accustomed to; hot.
A curl of lemon skin. Never sugar.

$7.00 | 32 Pages | In Stock

May 27, 2013:
Refuge in the Shadows by Krikor Der Hohannesian

Refuge in the Shadows by Krikor Der Hohannesian Refuge in the Shadows by Krikor Der Hohannesian
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Krikor Der Hohannesian lives in Medford, MA and has been writing poetry for some 40 years though only submitting work over the past several years. Since then, he has had poems published in many literary journals including The Evansville Review, The South Carolina Review, Atlanta Review, Peregrine, The New Renaissance, Hawaii Pacific Review and Connecticut Review. He also received honorable mention for the New England Poetry Club's Gretchen Warren Award for best published poem of 2010. His first chapbook, "Ghosts and Whispers," has been published by Finishing Line Press (2010). He also serves as Assistant Treasurer of the New England Poetry Club.

Cover Art: Garabed Der Hohannesian

"In Krikor Der Hohannesian's poetry, we hear things we might not be able to hear otherwise. "A man is down" signals the wind and rain coming in from the east, and the poet listens. In another poem a wife is keening, a child is crying, and the poet listens, listens with all his imagination and his heart. We hear colonial whispers emanating from the Granary Burial Ground. We hear the particular beauty of the names of the winds in many languages, and in another poem we hear the equally specific sadness of parents grieving a lost child. We hear final words, and words that should have been said, and we hear in several of these poems the long, agonized memory traces of the Armenian genocide. In all there is a deeply empathic imagination at work, and these poems give the poet and the reader alike a place of refuge, a place in the shadows in which to hold onto what is so profoundly dear and filled with meaning."
–Fred Marchant, Author of The Looking House


CRATERS OF THE MOON

      "…and the dead tree gives no shelter"
      T.S. Eliot – The Wasteland

the land is not quite black here,
more the deathly gray of volcanic ash
that mimes the absence of color.
Hiroshima might have looked like this
the morning after. Squeezed hard

between fissures in a vast mantle of tuff
haphazard scrub pine stretch gaunt fingers
skyward, clawing for what they cannot eke
from leached earth. Forlorn natural scarecrows

with no birds to scare off nor crops to shade
forsaken even by black buzzards
looping in futile parabolas.

Craters of the Moon National Monument Idaho


Reviews

Boston Area Small Press And Poetry Scene
Review by Dennis Daly

June 9, 2013
Refuge in the Shadows: by Krikor Der Hohannesian
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/

$7.00 | 44 Pages | In Stock

May 27, 2013:
Imaginary Planet poems by Alan Elyshevitz

Imaginary Planet poems by Alan Elyshevitz Imaginary Planet poems by Alan Elyshevitz
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Winner of the 2011 Cervená Barva Press Poetry Contest

Alan Elyshevitz is a poet and short story writer who was born in New York City and now lives in East Norriton, PA. He is the author of a short story collection, The Widows and Orphans Fund (Stephen F. Austin State University Press), and two poetry chapbooks, The Splinter in Passion’s Paw (New Spirit) and Theory of Everything (Pudding House). He is a two-time recipient of a fellowship in fiction writing from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor of English at the Community College of Philadelphia.


"To put it in baseball terms, Alan Elyshevitz is a five-tool poet: his poems smooth as silk, whether he's imagining Akhmatova, trying to make sense, as we all are, of this often confusing world, or acknowledging that while pizza may be bad for you, it’s heavenly and he’s going to enjoy some slices. How can you not love a poet who writes, "The soul cranes its neck to observe/the maximum number of yellow bikinis"? Imaginary Planet is full of such nuggets, a book with intelligence and compassion to burn. Elyshevitz is a poet to savor and be thankful for."
—Tim Suermondt, author of Just Beautiful


Reviews

Review by Doug Holder: http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2013/06/imaginary-planet-poems-by-alan.html?spref=fb

$7.00 | 35 Pages | In Stock

March 7, 2013:
Microtones by Robert Vaughan

Microtones by Robert Vaughan Microtones by Robert Vaughan
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Robert Vaughan leads writing roundtables at Redbird- Redoak Writing. His writing has appeared in hundreds of journals. His short prose, “10,000 Dollar Pyramid” was a finalist in the Micro-Fiction Awards 2012. Also, “Ten Notes to the Guy Studying Jujitsu” was a finalist for the Gertrude Stein Award 2013. He is senior flash fiction editor at JMWW, and Lost in Thought magazines. His book, Flash Fiction Fridays, is at Amazon. His website is at: http://www.robert-vaughan.com/


"Hip, rousing, and utterly winning, Microtones reveals Robert Vaughan as a sly master of concision, a nimble ringmaster of short-takes and X-ray-savvy mini-portraits. Buoyant, brimming with clear-eyed humor ("I have a bachelor of arts in folding laundry") and a larkish cinema verité candor, leavened with small gusts of compassion and social acumen, this is a chapbook Frank O'Hara would have loved."
—Cyrus Cassells, author of The Crossed-Out Swastika

"Robert Vaughan sucks us into his luminous vortex with guts, humor and grit. Microtones is as much about transcendence as falling. Vaughan blasts through the subterfuge of the unsaid and lets us "face gravity head-on." This is a fearless, unparalleled collection reminiscent of Lydia Davis that takes us on a "free fall" of a ride we want to jump back on over and over again. Read it!"
—Meg Tuite, author of Domestic Apparition


Legacy

An observer would have
thought her unsuited
for that frame.

I wondered why my
parents kept the photo on
the piano. She'd died over

ten years ago. Died on her
own, by her own stupidity.
A visitor would have

thought her adorable,
precocious, serene.
Unable to see the contagious

recklessness. Unable to see
the damage she inflicted.
How my family came undone.

I slip her photo into
the desk drawer. Underneath
a stack of report cards.


Reviews

Sabotage Review:
http://sabotagereviews.com/2013/08/07/microtones-by-robert-vaughan/

Flash Fiction Chronicles:
http://www.everydayfiction.com/flashfictionblog/book-review-microtones-by-robert-vaughan/

Counterexample Poetics:
http://www.counterexamplepoetics.com/2013/07/meg-tuite-interviews-robert-vaughan-for.html

"Microtones," reviewed by Michael Gillan Maxwell
Your Own Backyard
June 9, 2013
http://michaelgillanmaxwell.com/

$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-9-2 | 36 Pages | In Stock

March 7, 2013:
amores gitano (gypsy loves) by Roberto Carlos Garcia

amores gitano (gypsy loves) by Roberto Carlos Garcia amores gitano (gypsy loves)
by Roberto Carlos Garcia
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Roberto Carlos Garcia's work has appeared in Connotation Press- An Online Artifact, Wilderness House Literary Review, Poets & Artists Magazine, Metazen, Atticus Review, and others. His fiction is included in the anthology "The Lost Children," a book of 30 short stories to benefit children's charities PROTECT and Children 1st U.K.

"Amores Gitano (gypsy loves)" is his first chapbook.

A native New Yorker, he now lives and works in New Jersey where he is pursuing an MFA in Poetry and Poetry Translation at Drew University's Low Residency MFA Program.

You can follow Roberto Carlos Garcia on Twitter at @thespokenmind. His website is www.robertocarlosgarcia.tumblr.com


"In his chapbook, amores gitano, Roberto Carlos Garcia breathes adult passion into the craft of desire, these poems strip themselves, naked. They flirt and they want and each section a near erotic frame of determined risk ready to widen the realm of the reader's senses. Here is a poet who can dress and undress the lyric with his mind, hands and tongue."
—Thomas Sayers Ellis, Author of Skin Inc. Identity Repair Poems and The Maverick Room

"Roberto Carlos Garcia gives us twenty stunning gypsy loves in amores gitano that together construct a language so wrought with desire it swaggers. This is a luminous book that marks the emergence of a new and important voice that is sure to stir up all kinds of bad."
—Sean Nevin, Author of Oblivio Gate


18.

There's a cruelty
about her
that's always hungry.

When she finally takes,
finally tastes flesh
& is full,
what's left of me
is loved again,
her cruelty abates.

In many ways
I'm a keeper
in a zoo.

Once the lions are fed
I can enter the cage
but still,
I'm leaving my life
to chance.

$7.00 | 30 Pages | In Stock

January 25, 2012:
Except for That Poems by Rachel Goldstein

Except for That Poems by Rachel Goldstein Except for That Poems by Rachel Goldstein
Červená Barva Press, 2013

Cover Artist: Rachel Goldstein

Rachel Goldstein is the daughter of Holocaust survivors. She was born in Germany in 1946 in a displaced person’s hospital. At the age of two, she moved to La Paz, Bolivia with her parents. Five years later, her family emigrated to Montreal, Canada, where she completed her education with a degree in English Literature from McGill University. Her poems have been widely published. In 2005, she won Second Prize in the Robert Penn Warren Award.


"The daughter of Holocaust survivors, Rachel Goldstein writes with a searing authenticity haunting in its evocative power. Her spare, elegant poems provide intimate and poignant insights into a harrowing time and lives lived bravely afterward."
—Barbara Wallace Grossman, Professor of Drama, Tufts University; Presidential Appointee to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (2000-2005)

"In this biographical collection, the author chronicles her parents' experiences before, during and after World War II. She helps the reader understand, "you were not there [when] eyes tilted toward the impossible." Each and every one of them was a "skin-thin weight [with] miles of wind in their bones." Their story will not die as long as "the willows still stand faithful in leafy gowns" and daughter-poet "sing what will not be redeemed.""
—Michal Mahgerefteh, Publisher Poetica Magazine


Reviews

Feb. 2, 2013 Doug Holder Blogspot Review:
Review of Except For That by Rachel Goldstein

$8.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-1-6 | 33 Pages | In Stock

November 19, 2012:
Posture a fiction chapbook by Ateet Tuli

Posture by Ateet Tuli Posture by Ateet Tuli
Červená Barva Press, 2012

Winner of the 2011 Červená Barva Press Fiction Contest
Judge: Catherine Sasanov

Ateet Tuli lives and works in New York City.
Cover art by Ateet Tuli.


Fortune Teller

Perfume bomb whose silk surface protects a silver subcutaneous and is surrounded by parchment, you draw me close with evocations of mother preparing Dal for the week. The remembered architecture of you below cinnamon, against cardamom, below lime draws me so close I overlook your anger, which makes me cry.

You are capable of destruction, of warping a weft of garlic and chilies. I could cool you, put you in the fridge till you cannot overwhelm me. I could heat you, sweat you till natural sugar caramelizes and you can tell me nothing. I could hurt you also, dear onion. A mutual respect actualized as we grasp each other.

Pulled from a womb of dirt, you also have roots in ancient Asia. In eating you, I eat my relatives; their ashes fed your ancestry where they were spread. The dance of eating and burning you within my own burning body fertilizes the future, when in turn I will feed your children.

I dissect you, your rings akin to those of a tree, until I reach and consume your center. Its delicate youth lingers on my breath and is a flashlight for my tongue.

$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9883713-3-0 | 22 Pages | In Stock

August 23, 2012:
Burden of Solace Poems by Teneice Durrant Delgado

Burden of Solace poems by Teneice Durrant Delgado Burden of Solace Poems by Teneice Durrant Delgado
Červená Barva Press, 2012

Teneice Durrant Delgado is a co-founder and poetry editor for Blood Lotus: an online literary journal, and a proud graduate of Spalding University’s Low-Residency MFA. She is the publisher and managing editor for Winged City Press Chapbooks and also serves on the editorial board for New Sins Press.

Teneice is originally from Akron, Ohio but currently lives in Dayton, Ohio. Her poems have appeared in the Valparaiso Poetry Review, The Heartland Review, The Furnace Review, Pirene’s Fountain, Glass, Pisgah Review, Soundings East and in two chapbooks: Flame Above Flame and The Goldilocks Complex. She is currently pursuing a degree in Community Counseling at the University of Dayton.

Author’s Note
I have strived to make this chapbook as historically accurate as possible. There is not much information on the Irish Slave trade, but I found Testimony of an Irish Slave Girl by Kate McCafferty and To Hell, or Barbados: the ethnic cleansing of Ireland by Sean O’Callaghan to be particularly insightful. I’m also grateful to Dr. Natalie Zacek for meeting with me after a random email and an even more random trip to Manchester, U.K.


"In Burden of Solace, Teneice Delgado’s poems guide us through the brutality of the Irish slave trade while making a clear and poetic argument for human resilience and dignity under seemingly unendurable circumstances. This poet’s ear is clearly tuned to the past. Delgado tells a story that needs to be heard and she gives deft voice to the resigned and defiant."
—Kathleen Driskel, Associate Professor of Creative Writing, Spalding University

"In Burden of Solace, Teneice Durrant Delgado boldly examines pain, fear, inevitability, and the soul’s arduous endurance. These poems yield an understanding of human captivity from new, devastating angles, and they vividly convey the ways in which hope can wither and flare."
—Marcus Jackson, Cave Canem Fellow

It is ironic that theorists proclaim we may be in a post-racial society. Since poets are truth-seekers and truth-tellers, more and more books being published - and lauded - investigate race. Teneice Durrant Delgado’s latest effort, from her poems “Susan” through “Jamaica,” delve both deeply and deftly into the Irish slave trade, which has not been widely discussed. The poems in this collection, “Solace,” offer us the opposite. The Ship’s name remains one thing, while the planks rattle and the “air stood thick.” Reading work like this is what we need to do. We must remember slavery, for it is “something ancient and rage-filled,” but also current and must become forever “forbidden.”
—Glenn Sheldon author of Angels of Anarchy


Not John

I admire
the way he takes flogs
without flinching, hate him
for his strength when I cry
out. I wait, watch
his eyes. They are the color
of boiling molasses. He won’t lean
into any white womb. He spits on my
red face on his way through the field.
He doesn’t speak much
English, not many of us
slaves, white or black, do. But
he knows enough to say
I am not John. The mulatto driver
laughs with his whip. Get in line,
Not John.
Not white, he says,
not John. Not John won’t
say his real name. Barbados
isn’t big enough. He will not waste
his mothers' tongues
on rotting, sugar
sharp mouths.


Reviews

Poetry Matters: Poetry Book Reviews and Interviews
http://readwritepoetry.blogspot.com/2013/02/a-review-of-burden-of-solace-and.html

Review by Barbara Bialick:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2012/08/review-of-burden-of-solace-poems-by.html

$7.00 | 26 Pages | In Stock

July 9, 2012:
The Land of the Four Rivers by Matthew A. Hamilton

The Land of the Four Rivers by Matthew A. Hamilton The Land of the Four Rivers
My Experience as a US Peace Corps Volunteer in Armenia (2006-2008)
by Matthew A. Hamilton
Červená Barva Press, 2012

Matthew is an MFA candidate at Fairfield University and a poetry reader for Mason’s Road and Drunken Boat. Prior to graduate school, he served as a US Peace Corps Volunteer in Armenia (2006-2008) and the Philippines (2008-2010). He is also a former Legislative Assistant on Capitol Hill and a Benedictine Monk.

A 1999 graduate of Belmont Abbey College (BA History) Matthew is currently the librarian at Benedictine College Preparatory, an all-male, Catholic military high school. He lives in Richmond, Virginia.


The Land of the Four Rivers

I crawl out of the plane and walk
through a terminal that reminds me
of a prison I once visited in Moscow.
I smell soviet uniforms pushing people
out of moldy bread lines.
I see a black and white picture of two soldiers
beating a man in the frozen gulag.
I follow the line from baggage claim
out into the diesel air packed with greetings
and logistics, firm handshakes.
I throw my bag under the bus and take my seat,
fall asleep as we pull away toward the rising sun.
I wake up and look out the window.
Mt. Ararat is protruding
from the earth like a newborn’s tooth,
searching for the lost city of Noah,
the eyes of red delicious.
I see sun shadows, blue tears
of Eden dance in fields of cognac
and gold, the crevices of echoing snow
and yellow skies nourishing the navel
of the world.


Reviews

The winner for Peace Corps Writers 2013 Best Book of Poetry:
http://peacecorpsworldwide.org/pc-writers/2013/09/12/matthew-a-hamilton/

Fairfield University Review:
http://blog.fairfield.edu/inspired/?p=912

goodreads:
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15846136-the-land-of-the-four-rivers-my-experience-as-a-us-peace-corps-voluntee

Christopher Allen interviews Matthew A. Hamilton on his blog "I Must Be Off"
http://www.imustbeoff.com/#!/2012/05/expat-author-interview-with-matthew.html

$7.00 | 42 Pages | In Stock

June 16, 2012:
All This Dark 24 Tanka Sequences by John Elsberg & Eric Greinke

All This Dark 24 Tanka Sequences by John Elsberg & Eric Greinke All This Dark 24 Tanka Sequences
by John Elsberg & Eric Greinke
Červená Barva Press, 2012

This chapbook is a companion piece to Catching The Light: 12 Haiku Sequences by John Elsberg and Eric Greinke, which Červená Barva Press published in 2009.

Eric Greinke has been active on the literary scene for nearly fifty years. He has been a bookseller, a publisher, an editor, a creative writing teacher, a book reviewer and a social worker for special needs children. His published work includes poetry, fiction, translation, social criticism and poetics, and has appeared in many books and chapbooks and in journals such as The Hurricane Review, Abraxas, Chiron Review, New York Quarterly, Wilderness House Literary Review, Main St. Rag, The South Carolina Review, California Quarterly, Mad Poets Review, Home Planet News, The University of Tampa Review, and the Paterson Literary Review. He has won several prizes, most recently a 2012 Allen Ginsberg Poetry Award from the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College. His most recent books are Traveling Music (2011), Beyond Our Control - Two Collaborative Poems (with Hugh Fox, 2012) and Conversation Pieces - Selected Interviews (2012), all from Presa Press. He is known for his collaborations with other poets, including Ronnie Lane, Brian Adam, Mark Sonnenfeld, Harry Smith, Richard Kostelanetz, Marine Robert Warden and Hugh Fox. All This Dark is his second collaboration with John Elsberg. They are working on a third. Website: www.ericgreinke.com.


John Elsberg is a poet, reviewer, editor, and historian. He is the author of over a dozen books and chapbooks of poetry, and his work has been in a number of anthologies. He was the host of open poetry readings at The Writer’s Center in Bethesda, Maryland, for almost twenty-five years. He also has led various writing workshops, including explorations of experimental poetry with high school students. In the late 1970’s he was the fiction editor of Gargoyle. He has since been the editor or poetry editor of several other literary magazines, ranging from Bogg to The Delmarva Review on Maryland's Eastern Shore, where he and his wife Connie now spend a good part of their time. As a young man he taught for the University of Maryland, and then he spent many years as an editor/publisher of history books. His poems have appeared in a wide range of journals, such as Hanging Loose, the New Orleans Review, Lost & Found Times, Edgz, RAW NerVZ (Canada), American Tanka, and the Lilliput Review.
boggmag@aol.com


All This Dark

all this dark
stubble    in winter sun
but I know
beyond the next turn
the wheat    is neon green

*

cardinals
stay with us    through
the winter
an oriental bush
that blooms    in fall

*

late geese
across    a rising moon
long trumpets
playing in a royal court
they exit left    on cue


Reviews

Verse Wisconsin:
http://versewisconsin.org/Issue111/reviews/elsberg_greinke.html

Review by Dennis Daly:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2012/07/all-this-dark-24-tanka-sequences-by.html

$7.00 | 32 Pages | In Stock

March 3, 2012:
Circle Straight Back by Noel Sloboda

Circle Straight Back by Noel Sloboda Circle Straight Back by Noel Sloboda
Červená Barva Press, 2012

Originally from Massachusetts, Noel Sloboda lived in Missouri while earning his Ph.D. from Washington University. He currently serves as dramaturg for the Harrisburg Shakespeare Company and teaches at Penn State York. The author of the poetry collection Shell Games (sunnyoutside, 2008), he has also published several chapbooks. Learn more here: http://www2.yk.psu.edu/sites/njs16/


“In that ghostly area between flash fiction and prose poems, you’ll find the work of Noel Sloboda. At his best, his dry humor and easy way with a sentence propel you forward from each piece into the next. Not only will Sloboda show you where you’ve been in the world, he’ll let you know a bit about the future, too. His characters, ‘hungry for redemption,’ are the real achievement in this kind of short work. Solidly real, honest and forthright, they’ll stick with you like early childhood memories recalled by chance in the day-to-day struggle of living.”
—Rusty Barnes


Of Species

A tyrannosaurus and a triceratops put their heads together and guessed what would inevitably happen to all the dinosaurs, but the two could not agree how the end would come about.

It will surely be a flood, boomed the tyrannosaurus.

I rather suspect meteors will rain down, countered the triceratops in a loud contralto.

They debated for some time, before finally agreeing to disagree, since preventative measures—they decided—were more important, ultimately, than causes. United, they resolved to construct a massive canoe with a great umbrella mounted in its middle. They called their craft The Salvation, and as soon as it was seaworthy, they eagerly launched. In their haste, they forgot to bring paddles, and so the tyrannosaurus and triceratops drifted into the deeps, then drifted and drifted some more.

“It seems,” said the triceratops with an ironic smirk, “we’ve designed our own undoing. Surely, we’ll both starve out here.”

“One of us won’t,” said the tyrannosaurus, a gleam in one of his yellow eyes, which had a center shaped like a sharp tooth.

When he had finished his meal, the tyrannosaurs sighed heavily, regretting that his arms were too little to wipe his chops. Then he took down the umbrella and waited for the meteors.

Reviews

Flash Fiction Chronicles:
http://www.everydayfiction.com/flashfictionblog/book-review-circle-straight-back-by-noel-sloboda/

$7.00 | 34 Pages | In Stock

November 20, 2011:
Baptism by Michael J. Atwood

Baptism by Michael J.Atwood Baptism by Michael J. Atwood
Červená Barva Press, 2011

Michael J. Atwood is the author of the short story collection, HiStory of Santa Monica (Aqueous Books 2010) and a columnist and editor for the website, FastertThanForty.com. His work has appeared in a number of literary magazines and online journals. He is a graduate of the University of Southern California's Master of Professional Writing program, where he focused on fiction and screenwriting. As an undergraduate, Atwood studied at Boston College, majoring in English and interning for The Boston Globe. He now resides in North Attleborough with his wife, Melanie, and children, William, Megan, and Kelsey and is an English teacher in the Boston area. He is currently working on his first novel. For more information see www.mjatwood.com and www.historyofsantamonica.com.

Forward
"Baptism" was a story written out of hunger. I had been working on a collection of short stories for around seven years and no one wanted to publish it. It was lacking that final story, the single that every band needs to make their album a success. In fact, the only success I had realized as a writer was a story published by Gloria Mindock on her online journal called Istanbul Literary Review. The story was entitled "Ancient Hibernians." It the story of a young comedian's return from Santa Monica, California back to Boston to attend his favorite Irish uncle's funeral. With the recent capture of Whitey Bulger in that very same seaside city where I drafted "Ancient Hibernians," a Boston-Irish mob tale, "The Shebeen," and "Baptism," the fact that I wrote it and other tales about crime, addiction, and death seems quite eerie. As we all found out recently, Whitey Bulger lived anonymously just eight blocks away from me during the years 2002-2005 (we both had highly sought after "rent-control" apartments). For all I know, the leader of the Winter Hill Gang smiled walked past me as I pushed my son, William in his carriage on the 3rd Street Promenade.

"Baptism" is a story of an addict healing, being born again, and returning to his roots, his family. It is about a sacred Catholic ritual that few choose to take part in. Gabriel Bradley is a hesitant godfather in this story but he's also the baptized as he meets a new love and is anointed by the cold New England rain as he stares out to the Charles River thinking about his failure in sunny California. In the end, Gabriel has found himself again and realigns his values that have been corrupted by Hollywood and his semi-success there.
—Michael J. Atwood
June 2011

$7.00 | 31 Pages | In Stock

October 23, 2011:
The Hallelujah of Listening by Preston H. Hood
CD Version available also!

2012 Maine Literary Awards:
The Hallelujah of Listening by Preston H. Hood won the Book Award for Poetry!

The Hallelujah of Listening by Preston H. Hood The Hallelujah of Listening by Preston H. Hood
Červená Barva Press, 2011

The Cover Art is a photo of G. Buddy Swenson’s Elusive Liberty (August, 2001) Paint on Wood Panel (48”X”36”)

Preston Hood was born in Fall River, Massachusetts and grew up in Swansea, Mass. He served in Vietnam with SEAL TEAM 2 (1970), and was a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Boston, Bachelor of Arts in English, Magna cum laude, the University of Southern Maine, Bachelor of Science, and the University of Maine, Orono, Master of Education. For fifteen years, he was a member of Veteran’s for Peace. He published a poetry CD, Snake Medicine (2002), which was recorded by Berred Ouellette, and produced by Master Mind Audio. Summer Home Press published his first book of poetry, A Chill I Understand (2006). The Hallelujah of Listening is his first Chapbook (2011).

The Hallelujah of Listening by Preston H. Hood CD Version

A CD of Preston H. Hood reading his poems is also available for $7.00. It was recorded by Berred Ouellette and produced by Disc Makers. The cover art of the CD face is a photo of G. Buddy Swenson’s Elusive Liberty (August, 2001) Paint on Wood Panel (48”x 36”).

After attending The William Joiner Center for the Study of War and Social Consequences for 9 years, he edited with Jacqueline Loring and Gary Rafferty the Summer Home Review I (2002), and II (2005).

Through the Cape Cod Writer’s Center, he was interviewed with John McHugh, Secretary of the Henrich Böll Association, County Mayo, Ireland for Books of the World Television Program in Harwich MA (2006).

With Jacqueline Loring, he co-presented an overview of the Sixties Beat Poetry for The Wrinkle in Time: San Francisco Summer of Love (1967) Conference at Osher Life Long Learning Institute at University of Southern Maine. At the same workshop, he served on a panel discussion of both Civil Rights Issues and Why We Were in Vietnam (2009).

His poetry has been published in national and international journals and anthologies. He is a retired teacher and administrator currently writing his memoir. He spends his other time bicycling, kayaking, and hiking with his spouse Barbara J. Noone. He lives in Lyman, Maine.


The Hallelujah of Listening

From Dooniver we’re lured
   by angels in the sun-dappled wind. They dance
      with shadows, their radiant hair,
         a seascape of waves & salt sundog air.

Some of us walk through Achill’s mist
   anointed by the whispering surf. Or charge into a valley
      of an image, rave about the lowered moon
         behind Slievemore’s cloud-covered top.

Like first-light finches, I dart
   into the thicket, feel the cool
      morning silence. I climb with pilgrims
         under a salmon-coral sky, voices chant invocations.

The red-bellied fuchsias lift & sway
   on this steep path, bloodstones of penance. Even sheep
      turn to listen. I wish I knew if Croagh Patrick could be mindful
         of them, & us, rapt in our chorus of hallelujahs.


With this stunning collection, THE HALLELUJAH OF LISTENING, Preston Hood will take his place among the greatest of the poet-warriors and poet veterans of our times. Hood’s poems bear witness to how the human spirit survives that which would kill it. One speaker stitches up the opening in the sky “before the dead crawl out” (“Opening in the Sky”). Another, painting naked in the yard among the blue jays and bees, draws “a door in the sky to enter,” hoping to “find what’s lost” (“first born”). I’m awed by the poetic joining of courage and beauty in these fierce and precise poems.
—Cynthia Hogue, Professor, Maxine and Jonathan Marshall Chair in Modern and Contemporary Poetry at Arizona State University, Tempe; Or Consequence (2010).

I love Preston Hood’s new poems, and I cherish the spots of time he has been able to hold still in these poems just long enough to change your life. (From the Forward)
—Bruce Weigl

With Preston Hood’s The Hallelujah of Listening, I see a newfound confidence in the expression of his art. His beautiful images are often intimate and passionate, illusive and questioning, then shocking, real and haunting. As with other veteran poets, even when Preston’s poem is not about war, it forces you to think about warring, keeps you out of your comfort zone. In this new book, Preston asks us to “enter the mist, sit down in the fire of thought” to “let go of sorrow, let sorrow go” and promises, “the spirit lives to a renewal.” The journey is worth taking.
—Jacqueline M. Loring, Poet, Playwright, and Editor, Summer Home Review Anthologies, Volumes I and II

The poetry of Preston Hood’s The Hallelujah of Listening is indeed a “climb from the struggle into the marvelous” as he says in his poem, “Our Singing.” His new book reads almost like the scripture of Psalms such is its beauty and transcendence. Indeed, “a tongue of the sky” slipped into his mouth and our soul is awakened to the realms in which only poetry has a voice.
—Lamont B Steptoe, Publisher/founder of Whirlwind Press, Winner of the American Book Award (2005)


Reviews

Hayden's Ferry Review:
http://haydensferryreview.blogspot.com/2012/03/book-review-hallelujah-of-listening.html

$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-7-9 | 56 Pages | In Stock

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Buy the CD for $5.00 >

Buy the Book & CD for $12.00 >

May 24, 2011:
A Palace of Strangers Is No City by Stephen Frech

A Palace of Strangers Is No City by Stephen Frech A Palace of Strangers Is No City
by Stephen Frech
Červená Barva Press, 2011

Cover Art: Stanislav Lahoda

Stephen Frech has earned degrees from Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Cincinnati. He has published three volumes of poetry: Toward Evening and the Day Far Spent (Kent State University Press) won the 1995 Wick Poetry Chapbook Contest, If Not For These Wrinkles of Darkness won the White Pine Press Poetry Prize, published in 2001, and The Dark Villages of Childhood won the 2008 Mississippi Valley Poetry Chapbook Prize. He has been the recipient of the Elliston Poetry Writing Fellowship, the Milton Center Post-Graduate Writing Fellowship, and grants from the Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation and the Illinois Arts Council.

He is founder and editor of Oneiros Press, publisher of limited edition, letterpress poetry broadsides. Oneiros broadsides have been purchased by special collections libraries around the world, among them the Newberry Library (Chicago), the Beinecke Library at Yale, and the University of Amsterdam Print Collection.

Stephen Frech is Associate Professor of English at Millikin University.

Stephen Frech Website: www.stephenfrech.com


Stephen Frech in his sequence of prose poems called A Palace of Strangers Is No City gives us a Kafkaesque world, signaled by the very first poem that ends with the frightening uncertainty of whether an unknown “you” is having a carrousel maker’s dream, or whether the carrousel maker is having a dream of the “you.” […] There are of course many fine works that have dealt with imaginary and oppressive landscapes, but what makes Frech’s book wonderfully creepy is that the oppression is so deeply existential. […] Another prose sequence, Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities comes to mind, and with Frech’s mastery of the prose poem, it’s not an exaggeration to say A Palace of Strangers Is No City ranks with that masterpiece.
—Peter Johnson, from the Introduction

A Palace of Strangers Is No City is a one-of-a-kind experience. In just twenty-two elegant pages it contains an epic journey across an imagined city. The happenings in this city are surreal, ominous, funny and vivid. The circumstances may be dreamlike, but the longing and the wisdom are entirely real.
—John Dalton, author of Heaven Lake


1.
When the carrousel maker died, he dreamed of horses, wild horses, giraffes, zebras, deer, all running riderless but in bright carnival colors, as if every animal he'd sculpted and painted in garish and gilt colors were running wild again as they had for him very early when he was young and hardly knew the difference between wild animals and those that circled the carrousel.

You dreamed that night of escaping on a carrousel. The guards fire at you every time you come around again. You crouch down low to streamline your body for speed, then ride upright around the back side to slow it down, to delay the inevitable encounter with the guards. You are having one of his dreams, or he is having one of his dreams for you.

2.
Dreams of confinement and escape follow each other uninterrupted, night after night until the one looks like the other. You walk a beach sided by high cliffs and turn to climb stone steps leading up. They're covered with sand; they enter the rock cliff tunneling in, so you're climbing in darkness. But there's sunlight ahead. Finally, stepped into full light, you push open the gate of a picket fence. The spring creaks. On the gate, a sign, dusted over. You must brush off the lettering with your thumb. It says: This is not the way to the world. You must return to the beach down the steps. You look around. In the large fenced fields, grass has grown tall or the deep green of vegetable leaves spread in the sun. A woman has hiked her skirt up over her knees and she is bent over tending to a plant. A dog nearby begins to growl deep in his throat. You know you must leave and take the long, steep stairs, covered with sand, carrying the large bag of birdseed you've had with you all this time, searching for sure footing in the dark, back to the deserted beach where you find an endless line of stairwells leading up. You must try each one. Confinement. Escape. They need each other.

$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-3-1 | 33 Pages | In Stock
A Palace of Strangers Is No City by Stephen Frech

Broadside

$20.00 | In Stock


May 15, 2011:
MUD SEASON by Pamela Annas

MUD SEASON by Pamela Annas MUD SEASON by Pamela Annas
Červená Barva Press, 2011

Pamela Annas grew up in the Navy, constantly moving from country to country. She singlehandedly raised a child who’s now in college and is herself a professor and associate dean at University of Massachusetts Boston, member of the editorial collective of The Radical Teacher, author of a Disturbance in Mirrors: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath and co-author of two textbook/anthologies, Literature and Society and Against the Current. She looks forward to taking up blues harp in her retirement and in the meantime is quite pleased to see this first chapbook appear beautifully in print from Červená Barva Press.


"What resonates most clearly and powerfully in Pam Annas’s Mud Season is her ability to assume a variety of distinctive voices, and in so doing, speak from a variety of experiences. This is made possible because of the poet’s good ear for a diction that is not present simply to announce or decorate or please, but instead to carefully lure the reader into the lives she inhabits in order to tell a fresh and illuminating story of who we are."
—Bruce Weigl


Clotheslines

Back of the Navy housing project
the women hang the laundry.
Under a thin morning sun, braced
against a keening wind, my mother lifts
wet towels out of the wicker basket
heaves them to the curving clothesline
higher than the top of her head
and a late setting sickle moon.
I hand up the wooden pegs one by one
adrift in a cotton trance.

The back yards are a harbor of sails
rippling in the icy breeze.
Freezing stiff, cotton diapers
are lined up in ranks on review.
My brother and I play hide and seek
among the swaying sheets, or crouch
between two lines as in a bivouacked
tent, telling stories of heroes and feasts.
Rows of back doors, scuffed dirt,
a red tricycle.

Family uniforms come off the line
in a fading yellow afternoon. We
slide the pegs back into their cloth bag,
stack frozen diapers in the basket.
Red chapped hands wrapped
around mugs of hot chocolate thaw
in the cramped steamy apartment.
Clean clothes relax into tenderness
throwing off a fresh cold scent,
silver notes from a Celtic harp.

My mother's life, the story of a day:
gathering, washing, hanging, drying,
sorting and folding, putting away.

$7.00 | 40 Pages | In Stock

February 10, 2011:
A Story and Poetry Chapbook Collection Edited by Susan Tepper

Valentine Day Massacre Edited by Susan Tepper Valentine Day Massacre Edited by Susan Tepper
Červená Barva Press, 2011

Fictionaut Authors' Valentine Day Massacre Challenge

Because I am a fool for love, I couldn't resist starting a Valentine Day Massacre challenge at Fictionaut. The result, as you see, is a complex assortment of printed goodies (white, milk, and dark chocolate) dedicated to valentines everywhere.
—Susan Tepper

Stories & Poems by:
Doug Bond, Angela Brett, Estelle Bruno, Sheldon Lee Compton, Sara T. Einhorn, David Erlewine, Susan Gibb, Frank Hinton, Matt Kang, Dorothee Lang, Ryan McDermott, John Minichillo, Kevin Paul Myrick, Nora Nadjarian, Ajay Nair, Gabriel Orgrease, Derek Osborne, Meg Pokrass, Sam Rasnake, Beate Sigriddaughter, Marcus Speh, Paul Steven Stone, Miles Tepper, Susan Tepper, xTx

February 11, 2011, Fictionaut blog:
http://blog.fictionaut.com/2011/02/11/valentines-day-massacres/

$7.00 | 49 Pages | In Stock

January 15, 2011: A new fiction chapbook from Zvi A. Sesling

Across Stones Of Bad Dreams Poems by Zvi A. Sesling Across Stones Of Bad Dreams
Poems by Zvi A. Sesling
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Zvi A. Sesling has published poems in Midstream, Saranac Review, New Delta Review, Voices Israel Anthology, Cyclamens & Swords, Ship of Fools, The Chaffin Journal, Poetica, Ibbetson Street, Istanbul Literary Review, Illya's Honey, Wavelength, Asphodel, Main Channel Voices and Hazmat Review, and many others. In 2004 he was awarded Third Place in the Reuben Rose International Poetry Competition and in 2007 he received First Prize in the Reuben Rose International Poetry Competition. He was selected to read his poetry at New England/Pen "Discovery" in 2008 by Boston Poet Laureate Sam Cornish. He is editor of the Muddy River Poetry Review.


January 17, 2010
Review: Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/

This great chapbook is about the giant dumpster of memory in the realm of past loves gone dead. The image of death carries right into the end, where Sesling imagines heaven as a welcoming place with a beautiful aquamarine sky like his mother’s ring…and yet there are his mother and father and relatives still instilling guilt and criticism and where “Piles of ancestors like old newspapers in the basement/will present themselves as headlines for me to acknowledge,…the sun yellow as the stars my aunts, uncles, cousins wore.” Only “Dogs from my past will bound forward through green fields,/tails wagging a quick metronome to their happy bark…” Continued...

$7.00 | 38 Pages | In Stock

November 6th: A new fiction chapbook from Joan Gelfand

Here and Abroad by Joan Gelfand Here and Abroad by Joan Gelfand
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Winner of the 2010 Červená Barva Press Fiction Contest, Judged by Dorothy Freudenthal

Joan's poetry, fiction, reviews and essays have appeared in national and international magazines, anthologies and literary journals including Rattle, Kalliope, The Toronto Quarterly, The Huffington Post and The MacGuffin. Past President of the Women's National Book Association, Joan is the Fiction Editor for Zeek Magazine and teaches in the California Poets in the Schools program. "A Dreamer's Guide to Cities and Streams" was published by SF Bay Press in 2009 and "Seeking Center," by Two Bridges Press in 2006. You can listen to her CD, "Transported," on reverbnation.com http://joangelfand.com


"Joan Gelfand is at her best in her new collection of short stories. They're quirky, original, and highly entertaining with surprising dark moments that will take your breath away."
—Mary Mackey Author of The Widow's War

"EAT WRITE LOVE. Joan Gelfand whisks us, briefly, to Paris, where the present meets the past in both its ugliness and its grace, to Florence, where art meets its cruelest friend, "art criticism," to a more anonymous if earthier place in our own land where families and lovers pass and balance, for a moment, on the pinnacle of Thanksgiving. Her stories, like her poetry, celebrate life and love, family, friendship, art - a scrumptious meal, and an intoxicating bottle of wine! (Warning: Do NOT read these stories on an empty stomach.)"
—Christopher Bernard, author of A Spy in the Ruins, cofounder of Caveat Lector

$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9831041-0-0 | 52 Pages | In Stock

October 16th: A new chapbook from Elaine Terranova

Elegiac: Footnotes to Rilke’s Duino Elegies by Elaine Terranova Elegiac: Footnotes to Rilke’s Duino Elegies by Elaine Terranova
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Elaine Terranova is the author of four collections of poems, Not To, New and Selected Poems (Sheep Meadow Press, 2006) which was a runner-up for the Poetry Society's William Carlos Williams Award, The Dog's Heart (Orchises Press, 2002), Damages (Copper Canyon Press, 1996), and The Cult of the Right Hand, winner of the 1990 Walt Whitman Award (Doubleday, 1991) and an earlier chapbook, Toward Morning/Swimmers (Hollow Spring Press, 1980), Her poems have appeared in magazines including The New Yorker, The American Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, The Virginia Quarterly Review, Cincinnati Review, Ploughshares, Boulevard, and Pleiades, and in these and other anthologies, A Gift of Tongues, Blood to Remember: American Poets write about the Holocaust, A Cadence of Hooves, and Riffing on Strings. Her work has been part of The Poetry Society's Poetry in Motion project. Her translation of Euripides' Iphigenia at Aulis appeared in the Penn Greek Drama Series (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998). She has received a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, a National Endowment in the Arts Fellowship in Literature, and two Pennsylvania Council on the Arts grants. She won the Anna Davidson Rosenberg competition in 1992 and has been Banister Writer in Residence at Sweet Briar College and a Fellow at Bread Loaf. She is a writing specialist at the Community College of Philadelphia and a faculty member of the Rutgers, Camden, MFA Program in Creative Writing.


"I've long admired Elaine Terranova's poetry and Elegiac is another first-rate collection. Taking Rilke's Duino Elegies as a starting point, these "footnotes" to the older poet's work are technically sophisticated and sonically lovely. They're also deeply moving, meditating on mortality, God, and the constantly vanishing past, retrievable only through the vagaries of memory or the creative imagination. These are beautiful, impressionistic poems distinguished especially for their shifting, subtle intelligence and their emotional force."
—Kevin Prufer, author of National Anthem

November 6, 2010
Review by Irene Koronas:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2010/11/elegiac-footnotes-to-rilkes-duino.html

$7.00 | 34 Pages | In Stock

October 16th: A new chapbook from Jendi Reiter
Winner of the 2010 Červená Barva Press Poetry Contest

Barbie at 50 by Jendi Reiter
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Winner of the 2010 Červená Barva Press Poetry Contest: Judged by Afaa Michael Weaver

Jendi Reiter's first book, A Talent for Sadness, was published in 2003 by Turning Point Books. Her poetry chapbook Swallow won the 2008 Flip Kelly Poetry Prize and was published in 2009 by Amsterdam Press. In 2010 she received a Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist's Grant for Poetry. Her work has appeared in Poetry, The New Criterion, Mudfish, American Fiction, The Adirondack Review, The Broome Review, FULCRUM, Juked, The Sow's Ear Poetry Review, Clackamas Literary Review, Alligator Juniper, MARGIE: The American Journal of Poetry, Phoebe, Best American Poetry 1990 and many other publications. She is the editor of Poetry Contest Insider, an online guide to over 750 literary contests, published by www.winningwriters.com.
Visit her blog at www.jendireiter.com.


Jendi Reiter's Barbie at 50 contains an inventive re-imagining of the fairytale woman as well as iconic images of women, including Barbie. The poems are replete with surprise and peppered with humor. In her poem, "The Fallen Angel Writes a Letter Home" she writes, "I never run out of language. I'm easy listening. /Background music for the long drive away /from that sunset field where they fell under / the sweep of a great and lively silence." Her poems resound with lyrical language, and are not bound for silence, but for reading.In "The Happiness Myth" she jests, "Inside me is a thin person,/ two policemen, a rhododendron, and a sheepdog /trying to get out." Inside Barbie at 50 there is much more; a collection of well-crafted and delightful, well-imagined poems.
—Lori Desrosiers

Barbie at 50 is a lush collection of poems with lines embroidered with the craft of a studied life. It's Barbie outdoing herself, leaving off the accursed weight of a 1950's perfectionism to discover the truth of genuine joy. These are poems of a life more real than any doll's, as they point up the grace of having confronted the problematic entanglements that attempt to derail a woman making her way through the puzzles of maturing in the last fifty years, a time studded with all ridiculous matter. These poems show us a difficult tenderness harvested from what makes us weep and what makes us shout out in celebration, what makes us laugh.
—Afaa Michael Weaver, Simmons College

Throughout this collection, various poems include reference to the following brands: Barbie and Ken, trademarks of Mattel Corp.; Maybelline, a trademark of L'Oréal USA Creative Inc.; and Project Runway, a trademark of Fashion Cents, LLC. No rights in these marks are claimed nor commercial affiliation intended.

$7.00 | 28 Pages | In Stock

September 2: A new chapbook by Hugh Fox

Where Sanity Begins by Hugh Fox Where Sanity Begins by Hugh Fox
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Hugh Fox is a 78 year old poet originally from Chicago, has spent most of his life teaching writing, American literature and film in Champaign-Urbana, Los Angeles, Caracas, Santa Catarina (Brazil), Buenos Aires, etc. He has 110 books published, his most recent being, The Collected Poetry of Hugh Fox, published last year by World Audience in New York.

CONJURING

My mind and clothes are caught
in March winds as
buildings and cars go flat,
whirled into remembrances
of worlds antedating ecological
suicide, when the last farmhouse
spoke and sick meant soft warm
milk, "supported," not "supporting,"
when all I had to do, after class
and homework, was to whirl and be
a paisano of yo-yo's and kites, bikes,
popsicles, chocolate bars, ice cream
and second-day doughnuts and smoke
whirled off bonfires where I was baking
potatoes underground, snow whirled
off buildings and I flew into the wind like
a comet, there were no walls between
me and my world and it all flowed through
and with me.

$7.00 | 57 Pages | In Stock

August 26: A new chapbook by Daniel Y. Harris and Adam Shechter

Paul Celan and the Messiah's Broken Levered Tongue: An Exponential Dyad by Daniel Y. Harris and Adam Shechter Paul Celan and the Messiah's Broken Levered Tongue: An Exponential Dyad
by Daniel Y. Harris and Adam Shechter
Červená Barva Press, 2010

As Ron Sukenick so aptly put it in his last book "Mosaic Man," Jews are both proto and posthuman. Adam Shechter and Daniel Y. Harris are possessed of that molten globe of fiery perdition that draws the brighter children of the tribe to the flame. Add poetry and oy! What can I say? Shechter and Harris have made another journey to the hellchamber of Jewish mystery/creation/death and came out in company, a big company that includes a lot of fried geniuses, but most of all they came out, and it's good to see them.
—Andrei Codrescu (www.codrescu.com), is the author of The Posthuman Dada Guide: Tzara and Lenin Play Chess (Princeton University Press) and edits Exquisite Corpse at (www. corpse.org).

I can't begin to comprehend/surround all that is transpiring here in this Harris/Shechter collaboration/fusion—I'll need other readings toward adequate bearings—but as Seine suicide Paul Celan hovers among these pages of prayerful heresies—"no Shabbos-always Shabbos"—I experience a language that wields "pen as scalpel," and I feel flayed but grateful for this awakening into wild inquiry/attack. By way of thousands of years of Jewish history & of their own lives slashed out in poems & prose pieces of mesmerizing power, even as they wonder if they've gone too far, these two visionaries/revisionists have made something powerful & new here, something of charismatic complication. Oi Vey, & mazel tov.
—William Heyen, author of Shoah Train: Poems, finalist for the National Book Award


Adam Shechter is from Un-Brooklyn, the imperceptible imperialist brownstone aesthetic of 1989 Prospect Park West benches by Garfield Street. Adam has never been published in The New Yorker and The Paris Review and this fact is likely to never change. For this reason, he started the online journal, The Blue Jew Yorker. Sadly, this quaintly anarchistic periodical has not found its reputation competitive with the above named titans of publishing. Still, Mr. Shechter receives great emotional satisfaction in publishing authors and artists in the journal. A tragic and ironic fact of Adam's life is that his neighborhood of birth and raising, Park Slope, now houses some of the most successful authors of the writing world. Roger Cohen moved in next to his parents, a house where the fabled Christiansen family once lived. In line with Freud, listening to the same song over and over is one of Adam's favorite hobbies.

Daniel Y. Harris, M.Div, holds a Master of Arts in Divinity from The University of Chicago, where he specialized in Jewish theology and comparative religion and wrote his dissertation on The Zohar. He is the author of Unio Mystica (Cross-Cultural Communications Press, 2009) and Hyperlinks of Anxiety (forthcoming from Cervena Barva Press, 2012). He is the associate editor of The Blue Jew Yorker. He is a three-time Pushcart Prize nominee. Among his credits are: The Pedestal Magazine, Exquisite Corpse, In Posse Review, European Judaism, SoMa Literary Review, Mad Hatters' Review, Poetry Salzburg Review, Wheelhouse Magazine, Moria, Ygdrasil, Wilderness House Literary Review, Poetry Magazine.com, Denver Quarterly, Convergence, Zeek: A Jewish Journal of Thought and Culture and The Other Voices International Among his art exhibitions credits are: The Jewish Community Library of San Francisco, Market Street Gallery, The Euphrat Museum and The Center for Visual Arts. His website is www.danielyharris.com.


Big Bridge, Jake Marmer’s review:
http://www.bigbridge.org/BB15/toc.html
Click here for PDF Version

Review in The Pedestal:
http://www.thepedestalmagazine.com/gallery.php?item=16628

Review in The Jewish Forward by Jake Marmer: http://blogs.forward.com/the-arty-semite/132899/

Paul Celan and the Messiah’s Broken Levered Tongue was picked as one of the 5 most important poetry books of 2010 by The Jewish Daily Forward. http://blogs.forward.com/the-arty-semite/134268/

$7.00 | 58 Pages | In Stock

July 1: A new chapbook by Thom Brucie

Moments Around The Campfire With A Vietnam Vet by Thom Brucie Moments Around The Campfire
With A Vietnam Vet
by Thom Brucie
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Thom Brucie earned his MA in English at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, and his PhD at Binghamton University. His short story collection, Still Waters: Five Stories was nominated for a Georgia Author of the Year award in the short fiction category. His poems and stories have appeared in a variety of journals, including DEROS, Southwestern Review, San Joaquin Review, Cappers, and others. He teaches American Literature and Creative Writing at Brewton-Parker College. He and his wife, Carol, have six children.


The poems in Moments Around The Campfire With A Vietnam Vet flow with an incredible narrative voice spoken from the recollected perspective of a ghost poet with a precise eye for detail, a poet who carries you along the beautiful waterfall of misery with your eyes wide open and your heart in your throat. Each poem commands the page, daring the reader to deny its verity and weight, forbidding the reader to dismiss the small totals of Vietnam we still don't speak about. Wow. These poems took my breath away.
~Lana Maht Wiggins, University of Louisiana; author of Notes From Refuge, Felix Voorhies Award winner

Moments Around The Campfire With A Vietnam Vet is full of poignant poems about various characters who fought in the Vietnam War. Thom Brucie's style is direct, his images clear and specific, and the poems often end on a sardonic or ironic note. He makes us feel as though we were actually invited into the camp circle to hear the stories of these people, to know their longings and aspirations and disappointments. This is one of the best books of war poems I've ever read. I promise, you won't be able to put it down.
~Maria Mazziotti Gillan, Binghamton University; American Book Award winner for All That Lies Between Us

Cover Photo: Members of the 3rd Bn, 12th Inf, 4th Inf Div, "take five" during bunker construction on Hill 530, Vietnam War, 1967.

$7.00 | 42 Pages | In Stock

May 27th: My Soul Still A Virgin by Gulnar Ali Balata

My Soul Still A Virgin by Gulnar Ali Balata My Soul Still A Virgin by Gulnar Ali Balata
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Cover painting by Ghada Habib

Gulnar Ali Balata was born in Iraqi Kurdistan in 1974. She is the author of two books of poems, Luna and Twelve Months (Hawar Press, 2006) and Song of the Sad Ruins (Hawar Press, 2008) published in Duhok, Iraq. Gulnar has had work appear in a number of literary journals, websites and anthologies in Kurdish and Arabic languages which are her first and second languages. She is now busy with her first story, a novel, and a third book of poetry.
She received an associates degree in English from Duhok, Iraq. She taught English for three years before she left home in 1996. Gulnar received an associates degree from Bunker Hill Community College in 2009. She currently is working on her bachelors degree in art. Her work has been published in newspapers and magazines in Kurdish and extensively on the Internet.
She has been listed as one of the top Kurdish women's voices in modern Kurdish poetry. Her poems have a romantic power. She uses a clean and pure vocabulary.


These are poems of exile, torn from the soil of the author's native Kurdistan. They are poems of the human spirit orphaned. They demand of the reader the care and compassion any orphan requires to retain hope and nurture the promise of return.
—T. Michael Sullivan, Director William Joiner Center's Writers' Workshop

Gulnar's poetry speaks in English the language of her native Kurdistan. The mountains, streams, and valleys are both harsh and sensitive barriers in the mist. The ever present partridge reminds us of the country's beauty and beyond them and before them lies its sadness. Gulnar Ali Balata is a wonderful poet whom it has been my great pleasure to work with for the past several years watching her adapt her Kurdish and Arabic poetry to English.
—Tom Hooper, Bunker Hill, Community College


My soul still a virgin

The night holds its wings
Over the side of my expecting heart,
leaving wilted roses dew
on the morning star's face
smiling for the coming morning
that follows gulls' cheers.

Tears of the sky
Flow for the grief of the night
And the vanquished body
hiding in the corner of the wilderness
Picks up his broken pieces
And what's left of his tears
To seek new.

Preoccupied in abhorrent life
the maiden spirit with
its portable undying thirst,
its mystery of existence
and sense of its freedom of dreams and hope
remain after the confiscation of
waking up in the dewy morning,
Overlooking from the longing window
The chirping of birds.

Three-colored autumn leaves
Squeezed with tears of grief last night
Despite struggling with the wind
Despite the rain
Adhering with tears on my car window
Smile on my face
Penetrate my skin
Dancing with Nightingale's music

Sorrows of the body's reeling roar;
and the Spirit is still a virgin
which Lies on the lips of glamour
Calling the Moon
Waiting for the morning star.

$7.00 | 38 Pages | In Stock

May 16, 2010: I'd Rather be Mexican by Charles P. Ries

I'd Rather be Mexican by Charles P. Ries I'd Rather be Mexican by Charles P. Ries
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Charles P. Ries lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His narrative poems, short stories, interviews, and poetry reviews have appeared in over two hundred print and electronic publications. He has received four Pushcart Prize nominations for his writing. He is the author of THE FATHERS WE FIND, a novel based on memory and five books of poetry. Most recently he was awarded the Wisconsin Regional Writers Association "Jade Ring" Award for humorous poetry. He is the former poetry editor for Word Riot (www.wordriot.org) and a former member of the board at the Woodland Pattern Book Center. Charles is Co-Chairman of the Wisconsin Poet Laureate Commission. He will have a book of poetry published in early 2010: Girl Friend & Other Mysteries of Love that will be published by Alternating Current Pre, Leah Angstman, Editor. He is a founding member of the Lake Shore Surf Club, the oldest fresh water surfing club on the Great Lakes (http://www.visitsheboygan.com/dairyland/). You may find additional samples of his work by going to: http://www.literati.net/Ries/


El Latino Blanco
      (The White Latin)

I woke up throughout the night
as the fleas kept biting my toes.
Just my toes – the rest of me
didn t seem to interest them.

"El Latino Blanco" the bartender called me as
I ordered double shots of tequila throughout the night,
one for me and one for my friend the large white rabbit
called El Conjito Blanco Grande who sat invisibly next to me,
as he has next to the other drunks who have used him as an
excuse to order doubles.

My dreams that night were ones of desolation and consolation.
Always in that order. I remember because the fleas kept me
on the edge of real time. Maybe they weren't fleas at all,
but insect sized psychic miners, biting me to lucidity and
injecting me with some sort of drunken-poet-dream-sex-venom.
I'm sure I'm not the first drunken poet to be visited in this way.
I'm sure I will not be the last.

As the morning came, the fleas went to sleep and I too drifted away
into a deep cold river, waking to a pure blue sky, a massive Mexican
hangover and the smell of black coffee served to me by a mescal worm named Little Rico.

$7.00 | 28 Pages | In Stock

April 15, 2010: Passions (monodrama) by Denis Emorine

Passions by Denis Emorine Passions (monodrama) by Denis Emorine
Translated from the French by Brian Cole
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Denis Emorine is the author of short stories, essays, poetry, and theater. He was born in 1956 in Paris and studied literature at the Sorbonne (University of Paris). His theatrical output has been staged in France and Russia. He has a great interest for Eastern Europe. In 2004, he won first prize (French) for his poetry at the Féile Filiochta International competition. His poetry has been published in Pphoo (India), Blue Beat Jacket (Japan), Snow Monkey, Cokefishing, Be Which Magazine, Poesia, (USA). His texts have been published in numerous e-zines including Cipher Journal, Mad Hatter's Review, Milk, The Salt River Review, Istanbul Literary Review, and WHL Review. His last publication was a play called, "On The Platform," (Červená Barva Press).


Salt for the Dead: 'Passions' by Denis Emorine
article by Michael T. Steffen

Sometimes while watching or reading drama we're struck by an insight, however subjective, that the theatre the author is presenting to us is the theatre of our own mind. The notion was impressed convincingly upon me once as I read 'Othello' and realized that Iago was not an actor of acts, but a protagonist, in the true sense of the word, of the tragic hero's passions. That is, Iago is the powerful agent of Doubt within Othello's own psyche.

It's interesting that Denis Emorine's one-act monodrama 'Passions' (released earlier this year by Cervená Barva Press) so deftly evokes this sense of isolated inner psychology, though unusually the drama of 'Passions' takes place in the wake of a personal crisis or tragedy, and the tables are turned. The protagonist, Frank, now has nothing to say. He lies on a bed motionless and speechless throughout the short play. Frederick, we gather from his bitter and plaintive monologue, has been the victim of a conspiracy (just what we are not told specifically) which Frank and another referred to as George have played out on him.

This whole displacement of focus from the acts that build to a climax, to the worded invective after, makes a good point in its demonstration of the destructive senseless gestures of regret and spite. We sense throughout the first half of the act that Frederick's wounded pride is fruitless. He can't even evoke the events of Frank and George's treachery, and we suspect moreover, because of this lack of details, that Frederick in fact has no case whatsoever, that he is suffering from delusions.

A further and more poignant point made by 'Passions' comes to our awareness when the insularity of the drama is disrupted toward the end of the play by the sound of footsteps rushing to the door outside the room. Here Frederick must realize that he has only deepened his own dilemma by elaborating his grief against his companion. Threatened by the arrival of a soldier, Frederick's roaring indignation is deflated. He is again frightened and pleading for Frank to help him. At this moment Frank's unresponsiveness grows haunted and meaningful.

Emorine's vision operates in terms of shadows and impulses, at the vanities of the essential soul, revealing his subjects unflinchingly at precisely their weakest, at the waste of their own worst powers. In its modest format of a chapbook, 'Passions' lurks with dark energy under the surface and filter of our all too frail human confidence.

$7.00 | 16 Pages | In Stock

March 16, 2010:
The Lines Are Not My friends Poems by Stacia M. Fleegal

The Lines Are Not My Friends Poems by Stacia Fleegal The Lines Are Not My Friends
Poems by Stacia M. Fleegal
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Stacia M. Fleegal is the author of Anatomy of a Shape-Shifter (WordTech, forthcoming 2010) and the chapbook A Fling with the Ground (Finishing Line Press, 2007). In 2009, individual poems were nominated for a Pushcart Prize and appeared or are forthcoming in Fourth River, The Louisville Review, Skidrow Penthouse, Pemmican, Blue Collar Review, The Kerf, Prick of the Spindle, New Verse News, Mobius: The Journal of Social Change, The Heartland Review, and Babel Fruit. She received her MFA in writing from Spalding University, is co-founder and managing editor of Blood Lotus (www.bloodlotus.org), and recently co-founded Imaginary Friend Press (named after Thomas McGrath's Letter to an Imaginary Friend) with her partner, the poet Dan Nowak.


An Unknown Poet's Grandiose Call to Action

If all the living world is your canvas and

   you can         see where there is red earth and
   you can         hear where there is white noise and
   you can         taste orange and yellow fruits and
   you can         smell purple in a hard-earned spring and
   you can         feel blackness or rainbows and

   you can         hug your children and
   you can         joke about incompetent leaders and
   you can         relate to suffering and
   you can         feel remorse and
   you can         stockpile food in your basement and
   you can         worship your television and
   you can         answer your phone when it rings and
   you can         buy things with promises and
   you can         never run out of promises and
   you can         promise that and
   you can         promise nothing else of substance and

   you can         hear about Darfur and Burma and
                           Lebanon and Detroit and
                           St. Louis and Miami and
                           rape-as-a-weapon and hate crimes and
                           drowned polar bears and extinct butterflies and
                           dead uninsured babies and jobs outsourced and
                           everyone everywhere casting stones and

   you can         sleep at night and

   you can         hold the tool you were given at birth on this soil and
   you can         appreciate art when being cultured is "in" and
   you can         testify that pictures on menus deepen hunger and
   you can         see the merit of having the whole picture

how then does your brush still hang lamely at your side?

$7.00 | 28 Pages | In Stock

February 27, 2010:
Snakes and Angels Adaptations of Indonesian Folk Tales by James Penha

Snakes and Angels Adaptations of Indonesian Folk Tales by James Penha Snakes and Angels Adaptations of Indonesian Folk Tales by James Penha
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Winner of the 2009 Cervena Barva Press Fiction Contest

A native New Yorker, James Penha has lived for the past eighteen years in Indonesia. He teaches at STB-ACS (International) School in Jakarta. No Bones to Carry, the latest volume of Penha's poetry, is available from New Sins Press at www.newsinspress.com. His award-winning 1992 chapbook On the Back of the Dragon is downloadable from Frugal Fiction at www.frugalfiction.com.
Among the most recent of his many other published works are articles in NCTE's Classroom Notes Plus; fiction at East of the Web, Big Pulp, and Ignavia; and poems in THEMA, Storie, Naugatuck River Review, Waterways, and in Only the Sea Keeps: Poetry of the Tsunami (Bayeux Press), and the two Silver Boomers anthologies. Penha edits The New Verse News, a website for current-events poetry at www.newversenews.com.


Since childhood when my father told me Jewish and/or Russian folk tales and my mother would conjure old German stories, I have been fascinated by tales based on the mists of past times. Now along comes James Penha, a native New Yorker living in Indonesia, who has written down three Indonesian folk tales. Usually one thinks of a page turner as a mystery or suspense novel, but Penha’s three tidy little stories wrapped up in 34 pages keep me reading until the end. And what endings! I won’t tell you, but I will say that the first story “Dust and Stone” will be familiar to many readers from other cultures because it has universal themes found in English and Greek literature, the Old Testament, among many others. The first tale tells about a magician who is turned into a dog during day and a man at night, the woman who loves and their son who....well, that’s enough for now. Just say you will enjoy this story as much as I did.

The second story, “The Farmer and His Angel” is another well known theme of love found and lost, deceit and redemption in which a young man finds the woman of his dreams and desire in a most unusual, and deceitful way and learns that in the long run the truth will be revealed.

The final tale in this trilogy is “The Snake Boy” which incorporates the themes of the first two stories, but with a different twist and a unique route by which it gets there and Penha’s interpretation of this – as with all three tales – is well and cleanly rendered.

Snakes and Angels will hold any reader’s interest and give parents new stories to tell their children at bedtime rather than the age old Mother Goose or Aesop fables that schools tell and parents repeat. These fresh takes are wonderful stories that teach and entertain at the same time and will last a long time in your memory.
-Review by Zvi A. Sesling

Like Baroque pearls on a string the narratives possess the beauty, wisdom and universality of folktales. The wonderful poetic adaptations speak to us today...
-Rochelle Owens

"Snakes And Angels" is a remarkable feat of preservation of folklore through ingenious retelling by a masterful hand. The mythic lives on through the creative effort to erase the division between past and present by giving it a new voice that tells us not what was but what is and always will be.
-George Economou

$7.00 | 34 Pages | In Stock

February 27, 2010: Commodity Fetishism by Susan Lewis

Commodity Fetishism by Susan Lewis Commodity Fetishism by Susan Lewis
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Winner of the 2009 Cervena Barva Press Poetry Contest

Susan Lewis is the author of "Animal Husbandry" (Finishing Line Press, 2008). Her poetry and fiction have appeared in numerous print and online journals, including Atlanta Review, Berkeley Poetry Review, Cimarron Review, The New Orleans Review, Phoebe, Raritan, Seneca Review, So To Speak, Verse, and Verse Daily. Her collaborations with composer Jonathan Golove have been performed at such venues as the Kennedy Center and Carnegie's Weill Hall.


Cold ontology and normative longing have met their antidote in these derivations of bright oughts from the imperfect is – progressions as hopeful as they are rigorous. Welcome to the unknowable nursery of tomorrow’s big payoff, the source of all tantalizing hypotheticals. Here even the schism between practitioners and their actions is not mere disconnect, it’s the animating principle that gives us room to evolve. Welcome to Susan Lewis’ genesis in the retort, lush with secret memes of closed door intimacy.
–Brendan Lorber, Editor/Publisher, Lungfull! Magazine

Commodity Fetishism is at once a verbal collage of the mental rigamarole of daily living and a compendium of irony and sentiment. These poems are terse yet opaque, jokey yet unapologetically consequential. This chapbook is off-beat, perfectly tuned, and compulsively readable.
–Wayne Thomas, Editor, The Tusculum Review


COMMODITY FETISHISM

Because he abhorred the notion of work, the young man turned his home into a museum, offering his life as the sole exhibit. Although at first there were few visitors, the curious were given to repetitive, even compulsive, attendance. Soon their devotion became contagious, and the museum's patrons grew in number, especially as the exhibits explored themes such as Restless Yearning, Acceptance, and Doubt. By the time Reexamination was put up, scores of disappointed viewers had to be turned away. When Resignation made way for Peaceful Detachment, the public rioted, insisting that the museum never close. Tearful strangers mobbed the old man with their grief and unreasonable need, forcing him to retreat the only way he could.

$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-692-00642-9 | 34 Pages | In Stock

December 2, 2009: Only A Mirage by Alexander G. Dryer

Only A Mirage by Alexander G. Dryer Only A Mirage by Alexander G. Dryer
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Červená Barva Press starts a children's poetry chapbook series. This is by solicitation only. Any manuscript received will be returned unread. Červená Barva Press is proud to publish our first in this series by Alexander G. Dryer. He is an excellent writer way beyond his age. We are very proud to publish this chapbook but will not publish where Alexander lives or any personal information about him since he is a child.


Alexander Gregory Dryer composed the poems in this book during the eighth, ninth, and tenth years of his life. He loves writing poems, but does not force the ideas onto paper or give himself deadlines. He really loves when the ideas just flow. Alexander says that his Auntie Woo-Woo is a source of inspiration for his poems. When asked to describe the room he writes in, he said, "It is a quiet room with lots of books, organized writing supplies, and my Lego creations."

Alexander lives with his mom, dad, two cats, and dog. He enjoys school, reading, learning to play the violin and piano, and building with Legos. When he grows up, he wants to be a paleontologist and a professional violinist.

Three Desert Haiku

I.    Prickly cactus grows
       Very high above the ground
       And resists the wind.

II.    Lake in the desert
        Glistens brightly in the sun
        Only a mirage.

III.    Snake slithers quickly
          To catch a spotted lizard
          That darts in the sand.

$5.00 | 18 Pages | In Stock

November 14, 2009: Catching The Light 12 Haiku Sequences by John Elsberg and Eric Greinke

Catching The Light 12 Haiku Sequences by John Elsberg and Eric Greinke Catching The Light 12 Haiku Sequences
by John Elsberg and Eric Greinke
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Eric Greinke has been active on the literary scene since the late sixties. He has studied and published with many of the major poets of the post-modern period, including Robert Bly, Ted Berrigan, Charles Reznikoff, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Creeley and Donald Hall. He has taught creative writing in Grand Rapids City School and for the Michigan Poets In The Schools program and spent 25 years as a social worker for special needs children. He has a long history of collaborations with other poets, including Ronnie Lane, Brian Adam, Harry Smith, Mark Sonnenfeld, Richard Kostelanetz and Hugh Fox. He has published poetry, fiction, translations, creative non-fiction and essays in hundreds of books and magazines internationally, including recent American appearances in The New York Quarterly, The California Quarterly, The South Carolina Review, The Mad Poets Review, and the Home Planet News. His work has been nominated six times for a Pushcart Prize. His long poem For The Living Dead won the 2008 Muses Review Award for Best Poem of the Year. His most recent poetry collection is Wild Strawberries. He lives with wife Roseanne on a Michigan lake where they publish under the Presa Press imprint.
www.ericgreinke.com.


John Elsberg is a poet, reviewer, editor, and historian. He is the author of over a dozen books and chapbooks of poetry, and his work has been in a number of anthologies. He also was the host of open poetry readings at The Writer's Center in Bethesda, Maryland, for almost twenty-five years. He has conducted various writing workshops (to include experimental poetry on the high school level) and judged numerous poetry contests. He was the fiction editor of Gargoyle in the late 1970's, and he has been the editor of Bogg: A Journal of Contemporary Writing since 1980. He also sits on the editorial board of The Delmarva Review on Maryland's Eastern Shore, where he and his wife Connie now spend a good part of their time. In terms of a "daytime job," as a young man he taught for the University of Maryland, and then he spent many years as an editor/publisher of history books. His poems have appeared in a wide range of journals, such as Hanging Loose, Blue Unicorn, the New Orleans Review, Lost & Found Times, RAW NerVZ (Canada), Modern Haiku, and the Lilliput Review.
boggmag@aol.com

England's 2010 Purple Patch Awards have been announced. Catching The Light is on their list (#14 of 20) of Best Individual Collections of the Year.
Check it yourselves at www.purplepatchpoetry.co.uk

$7.00 | 32 Pages | In Stock

November 14, 2009: Celebrity Slumbers by Judson Hamilton

Celebrity Slumbers by Judson Hamilton Celebrity Slumbers by Judson Hamilton
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Judson Hamilton lives in Wroclaw, Poland. He has a chapbook entitled ‘No Rainbow' (Greying Ghost Press) forthcoming this year. More of his work can be found by plugging his name into the search engine of your choice.

He can be reached at: be_mightee@hotmail.com


Celebrity Slumber [17]

We all stood in the greeting line after the wedding, waiting to congratulate Dustin Hoffman on his upcoming role as Nolan Ryan. When it came my turn I edged forward and gave him the requisite three kisses, ducking under the bill of his Astros cap and commented briefly on his sunset-striped uniform. He seemed taller in cleats as he transfixed me with a warm gaze, holding my hand in both of his mitts.

$7.00 | 35 Pages | In Stock

November 7, 2009: The Possibility of Recovery by William Delman

The Possibility of Recovery by William Delman The Possibility of Recovery by William Delman
Červená Barva Press, 2009

William Delman received the Academy of American Poets Prize at Boston University in 2006. His poetry has appeared in The Literary Review, The Massachusetts Review, Nimrod, Salamander, CT Review, Rhino, and other fine publications. He is the director of The Bay State Underground reading series at Boston University, and an editor at Agni Magazine.


Praise for "The Possibility of Recovery"

"William Delman sees with the encompassing range and stringent attention of true poetry: the haunted figures of a particular family are never far from the long reach of human history in these poems. Conversely, myth and epic, with all their imaginative force, are never far from the quirks and tragedies of actual American life."
-Robert Pinsky

"To make it more real' are the first words uttered in this book, and they name the impulse that is at the heart of William Delman's poetry. Here is mortal illness, the violence of war, the long-lingering effects of trauma, the way soul-wounds pass from parent to child, such things that one might naturally flinch from. But here too is finely-textured language, haunted and haunting imagery, and a sharply incised poetic line, all of which teaches us 'the art of seeing things' and with that, the possibility of recovery."
-Fred Marchant

"'Home, what is not here, and what is' Willian Delman's poems are intensely focused, mostly about domestic and familial history, but these seen, as in his wonderful poem, at once pitying and unrelenting, 'My Wedding Day in Brugge,' also in the context of our wars. The austere spareness of these poems is eloquent and moving."
-David ferry

$7.00 | 43 Pages | In Stock

October 18, 2009: A Rarity by Grzegorz Wróblewski

A Rarity by Grzegorz Wróblewski A Rarity by Grzegorz Wróblewski
Translated from the Polish by Agnieszka Pokojska
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Grzegorz Wróblewski, born in 1962 in Gdansk and raised in Warsaw, has been living in Copenhagen since 1985. He has published eight volumes of poetry and two collections of short prose pieces in Poland; three books of poetry, a book of poetic prose and an experimental novel (translations) in Denmark; and a book of selected poems in Bosnia-Herzegovina, as well as a selection of plays. His work has been translated into five languages. The English translations of his poems and/or plays have appeared in London Magazine, Poetry London, Magma Poetry, Parameter Magazine, Poetry Wales, The Delinquent, Chicago Review, 3rd bed, Eclectica, Mississippi Review, Absinthe: New European Writing, Common Knowledge, Word Riot, Practice: New Writing + Art, The Mercurian – A Theatrical Translation Review, Lyric, Exquisite Corpse, Jacket Magazine, West Wind Review and in the following anthologies: Altered State: The New Polish Poetry (Arc Publications, Todmorden, UK 2003), Carnivorous Boy Carnivorous Bird (Zephyr Press, Brookline, USA 2004), A Generation Defining Itself – In Our Own Words (MW Enterprises, USA 2007). A volume of his selected poems Our Flying Objects (Equipage Press, Cambridge, UK) was published in 2007. His chapbooks to date are: These Extraordinary People (erbacce-press, Liverpool, UK 2008) and Mercury Project (Toad Press, Claremont, USA 2008).

Agnieszka Pokojska is a freelance translator and editor, tutor in literary translation at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, and author of a number of articles on translation. Her translations into Polish include poems by Seamus Heaney, Robert Pinsky and Derek Walcott. Her translations of Grzegorz Wróblewski's poetry appeared in the anthology Carnivorous Boy Carnivorous Bird, in Lyric Poetry Review, West Wind Review, Eclectica Magazine, The Delinquent and Poetry Wales.

$7.00 | 32 Pages | In Stock

September 16, 2009: Unrestrained by Jennifer LeBlanc

Unrestrained by Jennifer LeBlanc Unrestrained by Jennifer LeBlanc
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Jennifer LeBlanc is currently pursuing a B.A. in English from Regis College in Weston, Massachusetts. Her book Coloring the Shadows (2009) won the Mary C. Bryan Women's Studies Award for 2009, and she represented Regis College at the 2009 Greater Boston Intercollegiate Poetry Festival. She is an editor of Regis College's literary journal, Hemetera, and her poetry has been published in Bolts of Silk, Oak Bend Review, and Up the Staircase, among others.

$7.00 | 28 Pages | In Stock

September 4, 2009: Beowulf by Martin Burke

Beowulf by Martin Burke Beowulf by Martin Burke
Červená Barva Press, 2009

"Burke is the eloquent essayist of the sublime"
Projected Letters

"His style is far ahead in terms of imaginative inventiveness
This is startling, original work"
Kiosque Review


Beowulf

TO BEGIN with the hero is inaccurate

Begin with his opposite
The one he must meet
The one he will forever be named by

Begin with time ripening to a specific purpose
With events entering history at a critical moment
Begin with Grendel

Grendel: beast/man/beast
Grendel: purpose-driven like no other
Grendel: a law unto himself

This is the one who names the hero for all time
The one doomed from the beginning
And yet this is not a minor role

O no
Not Grendel
Not the man-beast as he broods in his lair
Not as he plots the destruction he will bring
Not as he delights in the prospect

And he will bring destruction
O yes
Destruction and wanton despair
To those who cannot fight him

 

Martin Burke was born in Ireland but lives now in Brugge, Belgium

$7.00 | 52 Pages | In Stock

September 4, 2009: Waiting By Godot by Alexander Motyl

Waiting By Godot by Alexander Motyl Waiting By Godot by Alexander Motyl
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Alexander Motyl is a writer, painter, and professor. His novels include Whiskey Priest, Who Killed Andrei Warhol, and Flippancy. His art is represented by The Tori Collection. Motyl teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York City.

His web site is: www.AlexanderMotyl.webs.com.

 

$1.00 | 5 Pages | In Stock
Opuscula Small thoughts, hardly worthy of note. by Steve Glines Opuscula Small thoughts, hardly worthy of note
by Steve Glines
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Steve Glines, in addition to being the editor of Wilderness House Literary Review, is an essayist, journalist, storyteller, occasional poet and bon vivant. His motto is, "The best is barely good enough." Steve has published six books, only one of which might be considered even remotely "literary," a travelogue about Fiji. He has been published in Ibbetson Review, The Belmont Citizen, The Littleton Independent, Unix Review, Technology Review, The Boston Globe, The New York Times and The Hartford Current among others. He has never been published in The Paris Review, The Antioch Review, Crazyhorse, The Atlantic Monthly or The Kenyon Review. To these awesome credentials it should be added that he has never received a McArthur Award nor been nominated for a Pulitzer or Pushcart Prize. Still, for some reason, people like what he writes and, on occasion, even pay him for it.

$7.00 | 37 Pages | In Stock

 

Balancing on Unstable Ground by Francis Alix Balancing on Unstable Ground by Francis Alix
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Francis Alix's Balancing on Unstable Ground employs all the reader's senses – the poems bleed and chirp and thunder and exude odors both foul and fair. Through unstinting depictions of war and spent love, Alix chronicles what could be the end of things, but, with an alchemist's pen, transmutes them and us into a vivid way forward "on the wings of foraging birds."
-Lisa Beatman, author of Manufacturing America: Poems from the Factory Floor

Francis Alix's Balancing On Unstable Ground echoes Walt Whitman's "The Poetry of the Future," in which Whitman states, "The poetry of the future aims at the free expression of emotion… and to arouse and initiate more than to define or finish…" Alix's clear imagery and graceful short lines are concentrated in the emotions of loss, longing, and pity for the planet. They "arouse and initiate" a common feeling of sorrow in the reader as for the starving child in "Kansas" with "her bent legs grasped by her arms, /both thin as cornstalks" or the starlings in "The Journey" who are "exiled/dumped into the modern wild." His subjects are never totally defined or finished; rather they ignite the reader's own irony and melancholy. This affect is impressive in such minimalism. You can hear Alix's voice speaking them to you with a fervor for living that makes the ordinary extraordinary. Bravo on a well crafted first book whose control of language brings the poet and the reader into a tender dynamic.
-Jane Lunin Perel, Professor of Creative Writing and Women's Studies, Providence College

Reading Alix's work, I am reminded of this line from the song, Jungleland, by Bruce Springsteen, in which the lyrics protest, "And the poets down here don't write nothing at all, they just stand back and let it all be," frustrated that poets have somehow abdicated their responsibility by averting their eyes, but more importantly, their words from the struggles, triumphs and drama of everyday life. Alix has been recording life as only he can see it, our world seen through poetic eyes, unafraid to see the harsh realities and capable of sparkling revelations. He has been busy down here, knee-deep in a poets work, bringing our attention to the glories and cruelties, through poetic stories only he can tell. Whatever the subject, Alix slices to the heart of it, as only a poet can do. Springsteen is wrong. There are real poets down here, refusing to let it all be. Francis Alix is one of them.
-Eileen D'Angelo, Editor Mad Poets Review

$7.00 | 36 Pages | In Stock

 

A Settlement of Words Poems by Ioan Tepelea A Settlement of Words Poems by Ioan Tepelea
Translated from Romanian by Flavia Cosma
Červená Barva Press, 2009

Ioan Tepelea was born in Oradea, Romania on June 3, 1949. He graduated with a PhD in History and Philosophy at the University of Cluj, Romania. Since 1989 he distinguished himself as one of the most important animators of literary and scientific activities in Romania. A University Professor, Mr. Tepelea is the president of ASLA (Arts, Literature and Sciences Academy, Oradea, Romania). He is also the Editor en Chief of prestigious literary magazines such as Unu, Aurora and Altheia. Mr. Tepelea authored fourteen poetry collections, both in Romanian and bilingual editions. His work is represented in numerous anthologies in various countries and languages. Ioan Tepelea is a member of The Writers Union of Romania.


From the introduction:
Ioan Tepelea's intimate connection with the surrounding reality is characterized by a fabulous openness toward the universe. In his interior poetic space the entire universe is brought forth in all its wealth, in its most insignificant details, like a miraculous fairy tale Prince Charming.
Tepelea's poetry bears witness to a prolonged practice of cohabitation between the poet and these living creatures that are the words, establishing strong chemical and alchemical ties between the creator and his work...
Ion Popescu-Bradiceni

$7.00 | 24 Pages | In Stock

 

The Book Of Colors And Painters by Korkut Onaran The Book Of Colors And Painters by Korkut Onaran
Červená Barva Press, 2009

The Book of Colors and Painters contains a 15 page poem (titled The Book of Colors) and 6 shorter poems that complete each other. The Book of Colors attempts to create a community of colors, each having its own personality, along with the richness of relationships one can find in a community. By means of parentheses, footnotes, and parentheses in the footnotes, the poem tries to create multiple-voices and depth. The poem is organized like a one-act play with its opening, introduction, development, and closure. The sections - 15 in number - create a rhythm through which new themes are introduced and overlapped on the previous ones.

Korkut Onaran, originally from Turkey, lives in Boulder, Colorado. He practices architecture and urban design and teaches in University of Colorado as an assistant professor adjunct. He has received the second prize in 2006 Baltimore Review Poetry Competition. His poetry has been published in journals such as Penumbra, Rhino, Peralta, Colere, Writer's Journal, Water - Stone Review, Bayou, and White Pelican Review.

Korkut Onaran, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor Adjunct
College Of Architecture And Planning
University Of Colorado At Denver

$7.00 | 34 Pages | In Stock

 

Zero Boundaries by Irene Koronas Zero Boundaries by Irene Koronas
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Irene Koronas has a fine arts degree from Mass College of Art Boston. She is a multi media artist working with paint, collage, mono-printing, artists books and poetry. She is currently the poetry editor for Wilderness House Literary Review and is the submissions editor for Ibbetson Street Press. Her poetry has appeared in lummox journal, free verse journal, posey magazine and on line zines such as arcanam café, spearhead, index poetry, unblog, haiku hut and lynx. She has seven chap-books: 'work among friends,' 'where words drip,' 'perception, tongue on everyday,' 'species,' 'flat house' and 'to speak the meaning of being.' Her most recent book 'self portrait drawn from many' is published by ibbettson street press. Her poems also appear in anthologies.

 

$7.00 | 41 Pages | In Stock

 

Flowering Weeds by Robert K. Johnson Flowering Weeds by Robert K. Johnson
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Robert K. Johnson was born in New York City and later lived on Long Island. He obtained a B.A. from Hofstra College (now University); and earned graduate degrees from Cornell University and Denver University. Now retired, he was a university professor of English, mostly at Suffolk University in Boston, for many years. He is currently submissions editor of Ibbetson Street. Many of his poems have appeared individually in a wide variety of magazines and newspapers. Five full-length collections of his poetry, the most recent being From Mist To Shadow, have been published, plus two chapbooks.

 

$7.00 | 37 Pages | In Stock

 

From Tehran To Texas by Roger Sedarat From Tehran To Texas by Roger Sedarat
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Roger Sedarat's poetry collection, Dear Regime: Letters to the Islamic Republic, won Ohio University Press's Hollis Summers Award. His poems have also appeared in such journals as New England Review, Poet Lore, and Iranian.com. He is the recipient of scholarships to the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference as well as a St. Botolph Society poetry grant. He teaches poetry and translation in the MFA program at Queens College, City University of New York.

 

$7.00 | 38 Pages | In Stock

 

Investigations: The Mystery Of The Girl Sleuth by Kathleen Aguero Investigations: The Mystery Of The Girl Sleuth by Kathleen Aguero
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Kathleen Aguero's books of poetry include, Daughter Of (Cedar Hill Books), The Real Weather (Hanging Loose Press), and Thirsty Day (Alice James Books). She has edited three volumes of multicultural literature published by the University of Georgia Press and has an essay in the anthology, Why I'm Still Married. The recipient of grants from the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and the Elgin Cox Foundation, she is a Professor of English at Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill, MA, teaching in their low-residency MFA and undergraduate programs.


Review:
Investigations: The Mystery of the Girl Sleuth

Investigations is a celebration of Nancy Drew novels (50 years) during the late 1950’s. she led a way for young women who wanted more than what they, may of perceived, as domestic boredom. Nancy did not have the proverbial mother to relate too. she also had an absentee father, a lawyer. this left the young investigator on her won to rife out her suspicions. unlike superman who needed superpowers to accomplish his task of riding the world of evil doers, Nancy worked closely with her friends for what seemed a more human story.

“I understand, the mysteries of the scoured pot,
clogged toilet, tolling dinner bell,
hold no appeal. but chances are you’re not
going to marry Carson Drew,
conveniently absent when the action starts,
never demanding you halt mid-case to listen
to his tale of triumph at the office…”

Nancy Drew’s tale has been placed into the capable hands or words of Kathleen Aguero. Aguero translates, reinvents and looks for clues that relate to her present situations as in, ‘the case of the suicidal friend,’ “you didn’t leave a note, just your own body on the stairs.” and again in ‘jewel box,’ which I had the privilege of hearing the poet read Aguero shows us her mother’s delusional clarity, her mother’s love, the perception of honesty in leaving, of placing value in memory, connecting, collecting personal items, identifying their significance, “we have to do this now…” her poems are full of references, clues; the password:

“she was clever.
she found the wooden gate where they put the garbage out.
she pulled, but it was locked.
she waited, but no one came
so she joined the walkers, round and round the halls
out one door, in the other…

this is a clear case. this chapbook will leave you wanting more of Kathleen Aguero’s writing.

Irene Koronas
Poetry Editor
Ibbetson Street Press
www.ibbetsonpress.com


Fiddler Crab reviews chapbook "Investigations" by poet Kathleen Aguero: www.fiddlercrabreview.com

$7.00 | 34 Pages | In Stock

 

Brothers by Eric Wasserman
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Advance Praise for Brothers:
Take Faulkner's dicturn that "the past is never dead, it's not even past" and transpose it to late Forties L.A. In the grand tradition of John Gregory Dunne's True Confessions, Wasserman's taut little tale finds a mismatched pair of brothers clashing. explosively, at the dawn of the Blacklist era.
-Wesley Strick, screenwriter and author of Out There in the Dark

Eric Wasserman is the author of a collection of short fiction, The Temporary Life. His short story, "He's No Sandy Koufax," won first prize in the 13th Annual David Dornstein Creative Writing Contest. Brothers is the first chapter from his recently completed first novel, Celluloid Strangers. Eric is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Akron, wher he also teaches in the Northeast Ohio Master of Fine Arts Program (NEOMFA).

Visit him at www.ericwasserman.com

$7.00 | 19 Pages | In Stock

 

The Conquest of Somalia by Gary Beck The Conquest of Somalia by Gary Beck
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Gary Beck has spent most of his adult life as a theater director and worked as an art dealer when he couldn't earn a living in the theater. He has also been a tennis pro, a ditch digger and a salvage diver. His original plays and translations of Moliere, Aristophanes and Sophocles have been produced Off Broadway and toured colleges and outdoor performance venues. He currently lives in New York City, where he's busy writing fiction and his short stories have recently appeared in numerous literary magazines.

$7.00 | 36 Pages | In Stock

 

Stunted Inner-child Shot the TV by Mike Amado Stunted Inner-child Shot the TV by Mike Amado
Červená Barva Press, 2008

"Crossing the intersections between media, militarization, and post-9/11 consciousness, Amado's Stunted Inner-child Shot the TV, gives us a view of the complicated relationship between society and self, consumerism and identity."
-Edward J. Carvalho (Doctoral Candidate, Indiana University of Pennsylvania and author of solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short)

"Take Mike Amado's red Morpheus pill and follow him down the rabbit hole of America's mad matrix of warped dreams, tabloid icons, chrome-eyed military men and infopreachers....His writing is elastic, vivid and wise. With a heart for an undetermined and undetermining God, Amado's revolution cannot be downloaded. It's amazing any of us make it out alive."
-Lo Galluccio

Mike Amado is a performance poet, percussionst and drummer painfully in touch with the real-everyday and his work is filled with the real-time force of tough, hard-core lyrics and life that drags you into the midst of contemporary real reality: “There is a dealer/that sells lives/like pre-owed cars./I’m gonna trade in Angelina Jolie./Like a rusted up Chevy Sloper/she needs her soul rebuilt...//born to a fifteen year old,/a doomed kid/on the block/dodging bullets and rocks/and a life of Government checks.” (“Angelina Jolie Reincarnated,” p.20). Amado is especially relevant today because of his total immersion in the working-class/middle-class sense of downturning lifestyles and ways of coping. He’s like radical news-reports stripping off the overlays and lies and getting to the hard-cores: “Blessed be the bartenders and poker table dealers,/They are the certifiable psychos./They attach themselves to people who have/Knuckle-dragging tantrums and sing/the same, old song.../ “My money’s all gone, free-drink me!”No sprites or sun-gods, romantic landscapes, gods in the underbrush. Welcome to the whole of contemporary reality, as far as you can get out of the suburbs into the everydayness that most Americans are soaked in.
-Hugh Fox

$7.00 | 41 Pages | In Stock

 

The News Today by George Held The News Today by George Held
Červená Barva Press, 2008

The News Today is George Held's second chapbook from Červená Barva Press, the first being W Is for War (2006). His other poetry books include Beyond Renewal (2001) and the chapbooks Winged (1995), Salamander Love and Others (1998), Open & Shut (1999), Grounded (2005), The Art of Writing and Others (2007), and Phased (2008). Other books include the e-book American Poetry (2004), the art book Absolut Death & Others (2000) (with paintings by Roz Dimon), Martial Artist (2005) (translations of Martial's epigrams), and the anthology Touched by Eros (2002), which he edited. Held's poetry has appeared in more than a dozen anthologies, received five Pushcart Prize nominations, and been read by Garrison Keillor on The Writer's Almanac (NPR). He has co-edited The Ledge Poetry and Fiction Magazine since 1991. In addition, he served as a Fulbright lecturer in Czechoslovakia, 1973-76, and has been on the executive board of The South Fork Natural History Society and Museum (Bridgehampton, NY) since 1991.


Mark Lamoureux on four Červená Barva Press Chapbooks,
Gently Read Literature Review:
http://gentlyread.wordpress.com/2009/06/01/mark-lamoureux-on-four-cervena-barva-press-chapbooks/

$7.00 | 33 Pages | In Stock

 

Ten Songs From Bulgaria by Linda Nemec Foster Ten Songs From Bulgaria by Linda Nemec Foster
Červená Barva Press, 2008

The first lines in Linda Nemec Foster’s Ten Songs from Bulgaria, sing 'Small lives, small lives/ we are trapped inside/ small lives.' The paradox here is that Foster’s poems reveal how large and rich the worlds are in which these small lives are lived. In line after line, we encounter the depths and reach of those who live outside the zones of everyday safety. Foster makes herself vulnerable to a world 'as tangible as fog' with her own penetrating observations. She walks 'the long journey' and her poems reflect the haunting music of ode and elegy.
-Jack Ridl

These poems evoke--in their concision and clarity--intense, disturbing images of lives shredded into pieces so small all that’s left is the memory of having endured. They are caged inside the empty space of the page, which seems to want to suffocate their spare, fragile, incredible beauty. Each image speaks a world that is window and mirror of what we hide from in the fabricated assemblages we make against the truth these poems speak.
-Faye Kicknosway


Reviews

Linda Nemec Foster Interview: Michigan Public Radio (an affiliate of NPR) for their Stateside program, hosted by Cynthia Canty. http://www.michiganradio.org/post/bulgarian-photography-and-michigan-poetry-inspire-album

Mark Lamoureux on four Červená Barva Press Chapbooks,
Gently Read Literature Review:
http://gentlyread.wordpress.com/2009/06/01/mark-lamoureux-on-four-cervena-barva-press-chapbooks/

$7.00 | 20 Pages | In Stock

 

A Cure For Suicide by Larissa Shmailo A Cure For Suicide by Larissa Shmailo
Červená Barva Press, 2008

In "A Cure for Suicide” by Larissa Shmailo, Shmailo writes (as the founder of Fulcrum Magazine Philip Nikolayev points out in his introduction) as if she is …” constitutionally predestined to sing out her lines…her eyes filled with life and love, pain and death, freedom and coercion, the real of the mind and the imagined of the heart.” In the poem “Dancing with the Devil,” the poet sings about the need to throw caution to the wind and trip the light fantastic with the Devil:

“They say if you flirt with death,
you’re going to get a date;
But I don’t mind—the music’s fine,
And I love dancing with someone who can really lead.”

Shmailo put herself in the deceptive calmness of the eye of a hurricane, asks us to tell her what makes us tic, and takes us on the Harlem River Line, like the “Duke” took us on the “A” train. In a sea of mimics this poet is an original voice.
~Doug Holder/ Ibbetson Update/ May 2008


Mark Lamoureux on four Červená Barva Press Chapbooks,
Gently Read Literature Review:
http://gentlyread.wordpress.com/2009/06/01/mark-lamoureux-on-four-cervena-barva-press-chapbooks/

$7.00 | 47 Pages | In Stock

 

Discarded: Poems for My Apartments by Chad Parenteau Discarded: Poems for My Apartments by Chad Parenteau
Červená Barva Press, 2008

In this new collection by Chad Parenteau, the peculiar intimacies of the shared apartment experience emerge in imaginative and startling shapes. In Parenteau's stunning tropes, the apartment, now war zone, now toxic wasteland, now party palace, at once magical and mundane, finds its excited denizens "burning their hands on bulbs to stay awake, / afraid to miss a summoning." Parenteau musters poignancy, pathos, and the pathetic from the crowded sink and the discarded vodka bottles, breeding them into his lines with an acute and ironic sensuality. If, as the author contends, "The bed now leaves its own notches/on the backs of everyone/who's slept in it alone," these poems will leave their mark on the mind of any reader who has ever stammered through a roommate interview or suffocated from the incense sneaking under the crack at the bottom of a roommate's door.
-Tom Daley, Instructor for the Online School of Poetry

$7.00 | 25 Pages | In Stock

 

faustinetta, gegenschein, trapunto by Diane Wald faustinetta, gegenschein, trapunto by Diane Wald
Červená Barva Press, 2008

These three poems somehow asked to be together. They are full of alive and dead people, full of genuine and created personalities, full of composite desires and fears and mockeries. They popped up out of the love of words, and the word-secrets we all hold dear. The title words brought me buckets of pleasure, and I wanted to celebrate and embellish them. One of them I made up, one of them I learned, one of them I'd forgotten I knew. I think all three are united in mystery, begging for me to believe them.
-Diane Wald

$7.00 | 20 Pages | In Stock

 

Tara by Catherine Sasanov Tara by Catherine Sasanov
Červená Barva Press, 2008

In 2005, poet Catherine Sasanov made an unsettling discovery: slaveholding had been an unspoken part of her family's history. Sasanov's painstaking search to find out what happened to the men, women, and children held by her ancestors is at the heart of her new chapbook, Tara. In its pages, Sasanov conjures Missouri's Antebellum landscape out of the ravages of urban sprawl. She pieces together a portrait of slaves and freedmen in poems haunted by the question: How does one write a coherent life of a people if only bits and scraps of their existence can be found?

 

$7.00 | 30 Pages | In Stock

 

Up From The Root Cellar by Anne Harding Woodworth
Červená Barva Press, 2008

If the root cellar connotes dark and damp, it also promises nourishment-and this book serves up a startling buffet. Whether imagining herself into a grave, a slaughterhouse, or a rose that holds a family memory, Anne Harding Woodworth is attentive to how "secrets rise to the surface." Her range of subject matter is startling-from famine to termites to dowsing for bodies-and she deftly works a root vegetable into nearly every poem, including one about the invention of the potato chip and another that turns the peeling of an Idaho into a sexy striptease. Up from the Root Cellar is rich with music, and brings a satisfying harvest of buried and strewn things to light.
Ellen Doré Watson, author of This Sharpening

In Up from the Root Cellar, Anne Harding Woodworth delights us with a quick and unblinking look to the cold, soupy, death-in-life world that roots our body's generation, and our ladders of art. Her poems feel through near-frozen "rhizomes / tightly wadded leaves," and wan cyclopean russet potatoes, "wide-eyed, looking for a way out," in order redefine the human form, the ways that the body seeks its "light-time" even as it must bow to physical limits, "dry-weighted, wet-weighted, scoped on dials, squeezed into ratio." Woodworth's instincts for the contrarian, and messy-microbial sources for human stories put her alongside the garden-shed bio-poetries of Roethke and Marianne Moore. Yet her sudden turns and wacky humor find their own force and presence.
David Gewanter, author of The Sleep of Reason

One of the many pleasures of poetry is that of coming into the company of an interesting mind. In Up from the Root Cellar, Anne Harding Woodworth uses her central metaphor to plumb the mysteries of preservation and renewal in ways that are fresh and surprising. Her tender, gently subversive poems, with their rich wordplay and mischievous imagery, succeed in bringing up from the darkness of the root cellar insights that delight and enlighten.
Jean Nordhaus, author of Innocence

Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene review:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/search?q=anne+harding+woodworth

$7.00 | 45 Pages | In Stock

 

this is where you go when you are gone
by Timothy Gager
Červená Barva press, 2008

This chapbook represents Timothy's best poems from 2007, a year that he had 32 accepted submissions. These poems are rich with emotion, humor, double meanings, happiness and regret. "this is where you go when you are gone" ranges of experiences, responses to social events and a poetic e-mails written to someone who felt his poems were too sad. Timothy Gager tells stories through his poetry and this collection represents a new and more mature and seasoned writer.

Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene Review

$7.00 | 43 Pages | In Stock

 

The Lengthening Radius For Hate
by Gary Fincke
Červená Barva press, 2008

The Lengthening Radius for Hate is a poem sequence that has, at its foundation, the shooting of Kent State students on May 4, 1970, by the National Guard. Gary Fincke was a student at Kent State in 1970, and he chronicles both the shooting and its residual effects over decades in a series of strongly observed narrative poems that explore disillusionment, anger, and the difficulties of reconciliation.

Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene Review:
http://dougholder.blogspot.com/search?q=gary+Fincke

$7.00 | 34 Pages | In Stock

 

Isolate Flecks by Kevin Gallagher
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Kevin Gallagher is the author of two chapbooks of poetry, Isolate Flecks (Červená Barva Press, 2008), and Looking for Lake Texcoco (Cy Gist, 2008). His poetry and reviews have appeared in such publications as The Boston Review, Emergency Almanac, Green Mountains Review, Harvard Review, Jacket, Peacework, the Partisan Review and elsewhere. In 2004 he edited a feature on Kenneth Rexroth for Jacket, and a chapbook titled Nevertheless: Some Gloucester Writers and Artists. From 1992 to 2002 he was a publisher and editor of compost magazine. A retrospective anthology of compost, co-edited with Margaret Bezucha, is titled There's No Place on Earth Like the World (Zephyr, 2006). He lives with his wife Kelly, and son Theo, in Newton, Massachusetts.


Mark Lamoureux on four Červená Barva Press Chapbooks,
Gently Read Literature Review:
http://gentlyread.wordpress.com/2009/06/01/mark-lamoureux-on-four-cervena-barva-press-chapbooks/

$7.00 | 39 Pages | In Stock

 

Survival Notes by Adrian S. Potter
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Winner of the 2006 Cervena Barva Press Fiction Chapbook Prize
Judge: Dorothy Freudenthal

Adrian S. Potter is the winner the 2003 Langston Hughes Poetry Contest and the 2005 Saturday Writers Short Story Contest. He has been published in more than 60 different literary journals, magazines, and websites including Colere, City Works, Reed, Out of Line, The Binnacle, Main Channel Voices, Blue Earth Review and Poesia.

Additional propaganda about Adrian and his writing can be found at http://adrianspotter.squarespace.com/.

Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene
Survival Notes by Adrian S. Potter

Somerville’s Cervena Barva Press has published a collection of very short stories or flash fiction by Adrian Potter: “Survival Notes.” Potter is the winner of the 2003 Langston Hughes Poetry Contest and has numerous publication credits. Potter’s pieces have a raw edge to them. They take place for the most part in urban settings with angry male characters in the midst of existential crises. One story that peaked my interest in this collection was “Domestic Silence.” In this story, an unfortunate neighbor to a loud and argumentative couple, tracks the jazz music the abusive male in this unfortunate coupling plays to mute the loud protests of his many domestic brawls.

I’ve lived here for two years, long enough that I can determine the topic of their disputes by what record is playing. Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue,” means that that the husband is releasing the frustration of financial woes onto her fragile ribcage. The swinging melodies of Duke Ellington are reserved for senseless shouting matches, the type of overreaction brought on by male jealousy. Electronic jazz-funk, like Herbie Hancock and the “Head Hunters,” is synonymous with the profanities and backhanded slaps that come from drinking binges. I don’t even have to explain the subtle irony when songs from Coltrane’s “ A Love Supreme” filter from underneath their doorway.”

I would like to see Potter develop more stories like this. He may be on to something.
Doug Holder/ Ibbetson Update/ Jan. 2008/ Somerville, Mass.

$7.00 | 42 Pages | In Stock

 

Illegal Border Crosser by Michael Graves
Červená Barva Press, 2008

Michael Graves was a student of James Wright. He is the author of a chapbook Outside St. Jude's (REM Press, 1990), which was re-issued as an ebook by Rattapallax, and is the recipient of a grant of $4,500 from the Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation for two thousand four. His first full-length collection of poems is Adam and Cain (Black Buzzard, 2006). He has published thirteen (13) poems in the James Joyce Quarterly and read a selection of his poems to a meeting of the James Joyce Society at the Gotham Book Mart in New York City. Professor A. Nicholas Fargnoli, President of the James Joyce Society has adopted some of his poems as required reading for his survey course in Modern American Literature. His poem "Apollo to Daphne" appears in Gods and Mortals: Modern Poems on Classical Myths (Oxford University Press 2001). He has published widely in journals and magazines, some of which include The Classical Outlook, European Judaism, The Journal of Irish Literature, Cumberland Poetry Review, nycBigCityLit-New York Edition, Writer's Forum, Rattapallax, The Hurricane Review, The Hollins Critic, Archipelago, and Salonika.

$7.00 | 36 Pages | In Stock

 

Among Us by Harris Gardner
Červená Barva Press, 2007

It is said the angels walk among us, the invisible. Gardner drapes the invisible with language in the hopes that we can see ourselves.
–Afaa M. Weaver

Gardner's vision here mainly focuses on angels. He's right out of scripture, brings biblical (and elsewhere) visions of angels into our contemporary world so that everything surrounding us becomes supernaturalized and uplifted., And always in a language that reads the way Monet paints. "The breeze stretches pliant forms/ kinetic art, brush-stroked clouds…/ Senses soar toward the sun/ when rays sear through languid clouds/ revealing noble haloed heads…" ("Among Us"). He is Mr. Visionary, taking the Torah and all other angel-sources like Milton, Raphael, "Dictionary of Angels", etc., and filling our world with uplifting such as you've never been uplifted into before. It's a vision sorely needed today, and technically the most masterful word-working on the contemporary or any other scene.
–Hugh Fox

Excerpt from a review
Angels have held a fascination for many writers: Milton, Hass, Hopkins, Billy Collins, to name a few. But how does one manage to address the imperceptible, let alone the holy? Gardner’s answer is to bring angels down to earth, to imbue them with human characteristics and foibles...This collection’s central strength is its admonition to the reader to look beyond the mundane. “Seeing angels may challenge your vision. / No cost to believe in noble winged creatures.” In our bitter post-post-modern age, this is a welcome thought.
Eleanor Goodman/ Ibbetson Update/ Jan 2008
Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene

$7.00 | 45 Pages | In Stock

 

Living Proof by Mary Bonina
Cervena Barva Press, 2007

Review excerpt from: Prick of the spindle,
"Mary Bonina’s Living Proof is a hefty 45 pages and worth every drop of ink Červená Barva Press shelled out to bring it into the world. Each poem reads like a miniature story, stabbing at the heart of memory and nostalgia, capturing lifetimes in a single moment or turn of phrase..."
--Jen Garfield, editor
Prick of the Spindle

To read the whole review:
http://www.prickofthespindle.com/reviews/

These are poems concerned with the primary relationships of our lives -- family, friends, lovers, nature -- and in them, there is always the larger world rattling around. This volume of narratives, lyrics, dialogues, and found poems demonstrates Bonina's accomplishment and range. Here is an assured voice imbued with musicality, surprising us in the simple way it offers up deeper meaning, often using imagery drawn from the everyday.

"...the voice of these poems knows death, luck, the mall, the hard edges of place, New England places, the violence of the world. It runs very concretely and in many poems, past what its bearer sees as if standing still in deep attention. It is written so that "he who runs may read" but turns entirely inside out the terms and assumptions of that old insult. What a place this human world would be if we all ran at Mary Bonina's speed, what Flannery O'Connor once called the terrible speed of mercy."
--Mary Baine Campbell
author of TROUBLE (poems), Carnegie Mellon U Press and The World, The Flesh, and Angels (poems), Beacon Press

$7.00 | 46 Pages | In Stock

 

Ferrovie by Anthony Russell White
Červená Barva Press, 2007

The 2006 Červená Barva Press Chapbook Poetry Prize Winner

Ferrovie is Italian for trains, and seemed appropriate for a series of poems about strange encounters on Italian trains. I was introduced to the prose poem in 1993 by Robert Bly at a workshop afloat in Alaska, and have been writing them ever since. Some poems just seem to want to be in that form. Some of these ten came from my dreams, a few from actual events, the remainder from pure unleashed imagination.
Anthony Russell White

$5.00 | 20 Pages | In Stock

 

Sister Mary Butkus by Ed McManis Sister Mary Butkus
by Ed McManis
Červená Barva Press, 2007

Ed McManis is a teacher, writer, poet, editor, songwriter, husband and dad—not always in that order. His work has appeared in more than 40 publications.

Cover art by Joe McManis

 

$7.00 | 37 Pages | In Stock

 

God of the Jellyfish by Lucille Lang Day God of the Jellyfish
by Lucille Lang Day
Červená Barva Press, 2007

At once sacrilegious and reverential, the poems in God of the Jellyfish seek the divine in a natural world governed by the laws of science. In these poems, you'll find a god in the shape of a jellyfish, a prayer celebrating the color red, a man for whom music becomes the source of salvation, a vision of an earthly paradise populated by moon bears and moon rats, and a pilgrimage through 14 stations where Sisyphus, Shaker women, and howling wolves appear. Lucille Lang Day deftly couples scientific observations to the engine of imagination to take us on a magical and inspiring journey.

God of the Jellyfish shimmers in a space where "moon cacti bloom at night" and magpies can "fly over a field/of small glass bottles." The world Lucille Lang Day creates in her poetry is vivid and surreal yet always deftly anchored in the beauty and truth of the natural world. This is a small handbook of magic. When you read it, you'll find yourself transported to places you've never even dared to imagine.
—Susan Terris

There are few contemporary poets who use science in their poetry at all, let alone use it as Lucille Lang Day does here, as an element, both dreamlike and hyperreal, in her gorgeous, moving global lyric.
—Richard Silberg

$7.00 | 39 Pages | In Stock

 

Land of the Morning Calm
by Susanne Morning
Červená Barva Press, 2007

South Korea, referred to as the hermit kingdom of Asia, has been the home of New Zealand author/painter Susanne Morning for the last 7 years. Fascinating and humorous, Land of the Morning Calm unearths the bizarre and unexpected elements of this ancient/modern Confucian culture. An archeological dig that will put dirt under your nails and priceless relics in your hands!

$7.00 | 29 Pages | In Stock

 

Of All The Meals I Had Before: Poems About Food and Eating Of All The Meals I Had Before: Poems About Food and Eating
by Doug Holder
Červená Barva Press, 2007

These food poems are served up spicy like Italian cousine. Read them before dinner or after dessert, either way like Chinese food, you'll return hungry for more.
A.D. Winans

In his collection, “Of All The Meals I Had Before: Poems About Food and Eating” Doug Holder serves up a hearty fare. He fills our plate with “unapologetically greasy Egg Foo Young,” “tamed tenderloin,” “a chorus line” of “rotisserie chickens,” and “some fraction of gelatinous liver quivering.” He not only takes us out to dine with him, but he also looks around for us, makes sure we notice the “ancient waitresses…[who] bark the orders\through the swing of doors” and “old man Cardullo spit from\his cigar-studded mouth” and the undertaker beside us who “delicately wipes his mouth\… runs his well-veined hand\through the shoe polish\in his hair.” Holder offers a truly eclectic cuisine and company to match– savory, and unsavory, occasionally bitter, more often sweet. Even as we polish off dessert, he leaves us wondering, “What If We Froze with a Fork in Our Hand” and “just\took a\minute\to simply\pause.”
Mary Buchinger Bodwell, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

A delightful and delicious collection of poems, whetting the appetite for more. These are the kinds of witty, Jewishy poems I envision Woody Allen would write, should he ever take to writing poetry.
Helen Bar-Lev, Artist, Poet
Editor-in-Chief Voices Israel Anthology
Author: Animals are Nature's Poetry
Co-author: Cyclamens and Swords and other poems about Israel

Doug Holder's All the Meals I Had Before delivers again and again. Each poem is a savory dish worthy of five stars at Loch Ober's. Holder's poetry feeds our high expectations and does not disappoint. His wit and erudite observations constantly shine with sterling results. A lot of the poetry has a certain edginess mixed with wit and humor that equally provokes to thought while it entertains. Everyone should indulge themselves in this gourmet buffet.This collection, as well as Holder's other published works, belong in every serious collectors library.
Harris Gardner
Executive Director
Tapestry of Voices

Aside from being the founder, publisher, and co-editor of the prestigious and influential Ibbetson Street Press, Doug Holder writes poetry with a passion and insight that deserves prestige and influence all its own.

Take, for instance, “Of All The Meals I Had Before: Poems About Food and Eating,” a work with an organic feel surprising for a chapbook. Among some odes to nostalgic eateries like “Last Night at the Wursthaus” and “At Benson’s Deli,” Holder ponders the silly—“Milk Duds”—and the sublime—“Portrait of My Mother During Her Solitary Meal.” His eye for the rattling image drives many of the poems, like “Eating Out” where he observes: “As the Latino/scrapes the masticated/bone and marrow/into a bloody bin/ and flashes a gold-toothed smile,/at the chef/ whose cleaver/tears through a prime cut--/then holds some/fraction of a gelatinous liver/quivering in his hands…” What makes his work so enjoyable is not only his well-described world but also the fun he has with it, as when he ends the same poem with the line,” “Meanwhile I order desert.” The book flirts with food and sex, comparing breastfeeding and sucking on a straw or rotisserie chickens and pornographic images, until it climaxes in the final poem “Cannibalism,” that begins:
“And what could be more intimate?/ To deflesh a skull/ crack a femur/ to get down/ to the very marrow/ Is there a greater/ act of love
?”
--S. Craig Renfroe, Jr., Main Street Rag
Winter 2007-8 Edition

$7.00 | 23 Pages | In Stock

 

Gothic Calligraphy Poems by Flavia Cosma
Červená Barva Press, 2007

Flavia Cosma is an acclaimed Romanian-born, Canadian poet, author and translator. She is also an award winning independent television documentary producer, director and writer. To date she has published nine books of poetry, a novel, a traveling memoir and a book of Fairy Tales. Her work is represented in numerous anthologies in various countries and languages.

Gothic Calligraphy, translated from the original Romanian by Flavia Cosma with Charles Siedlecki, is Flavia Cosma’s tenth poetry collection published in Somerville, Massachusetts by Červená Barva Press (2007). These poems are candid, romantic and metaphisical. What is particularly striking about the poems is their originality and the daring force of their imagery and metaphors, wonderfully rendered into English by this tantalizing, entrancing translation. The language is straightforward, spare, yet so bold in image as to seem extravagant.

Ioan Tepelea, poet and publisher, Oradea, Romania:
The inner equilibrium and the uniqueness of voice, but most of all the interior fervor to be oneself when faced with life’s adversity, turn these poems into an existential suffrage, revealing an authentic and personal vision.”

George Elliott Clarke, Department of English, University of Toronto:
Flavia Cosma’s vision is dark and Gothic, but also saturated with Mediterranean sun, romance and vine. Her style – imagistic, cryptic – reminds one of other powerful women writers such as America’s Emily Dickinson, Russia’s Anna Akhmatova and Canada’s Marie Uguay. Their poems are miniature fairy tales that enjoy being both sprightly and grim.”

David Mills, poet and literary critic, Toronto:
Flavia Cosma’s poetry has been designed to waken sleeping consciousness. These poems lead the reader through the pain, suffering and loneliness of life while searching for truth’s hidden mysteries which serve to make life meaningful and beautiful, yet remain to be discovered in that continual renewal and rebirth of life.”

Irene Harasimowicz-Zarzecka, foreword to Gothic Calligraphy:
A poet of extraordinary depth and sensitivity, combining in a permanent osmosis her state of mind and consciousness with the wealth of nature, always searching for the eternal, timeless values of our earthly sojourn. The baroque opulence of Flavia Cosma’s diction is worthy of a genuine master of the word.

Alexander Sfârlea, poet and literary critic, Oradea, Romania:
a review of Gothic Calligraphy:
What strikes the reader in Gothic Calligraphy is an anxious and intense perception of the existential struggle, which melts irreversibly into extinction and forgetfulness, an intangible and tragic descent into the inevitable nothingness, combined with the ultimate deliverance of coming to terms with oneself.”

Fragments from Gothic Calligraphy appeared in their Romanian version—In Bratele Tatalui, Cogito Press, Oradea, Romania, 2006.

$8.00 | 41 Pages | In Stock

 

Bilingual Poems by Richard Kostelanetz Bilingual Poems by Richard Kostelanetz
Červená Barva Press, 2007

Preface From the book:
If the principal theme of my poetry has been invention, one motive of the poems written since Wordworks (1993), my first elaborate collection, has been the clashing of languages. This reflects initially my interest in writing poems in languages I barely know--for instance, the French and German Strings reprinted there. As always, I make a move and then look for surprising results. Here one move is interweaving the letters of words in two languages; another comes from jamming two words together to form not only a larger word but an evocative intersection. Many other poetic developments should follow from these initial moves. Some depend upon understanding two languages; others, not. –Richard Kostelanetz, New York, NY

Review from Doug Holder's Authors Den:
http://authorsden.com/visit/viewarticle.asp?AuthorID=3792

$7.00 | 17 Pages | In Stock: Out of stock-Restocking soon

 

Out Of The Arcadian Ghetto Out Of The Arcadian Ghetto
A Fiction Chapbook by Ian Randall Wilson
Červená Barva Press, 2007

Ian Randall Wilson is the author of Hunger and Other Stories (Hollyridge Press, 2000), and the poetry chapbook Theme of the Parabola (Hollyridge Press, 2005). His work has appeared in many journals including the North American Review, the Mid-American Review and The Gettysburg Review. He is an executive at Columbia-TriStar Marketing Group, and on the fiction faculty at the UCLA Extension.

Out of the Arcadian Ghetto is a work of great imagination. It features two previously published stories. In "He Was Known For His Nose," a specialist employed by a reclusive millionaire selects female companionship for his master by the women's smell. When his nose fails, disaster ensues. In "The Three Bears: A Retelling," this classic fairytale is reconceived as a contemporary commentary on race relations between homo sapiens and Ursus arctos.

Small Press Review/ Mar-Apr Picks, 2007

$7.00 | 33 Pages | In Stock

 

Blue Edge chapbook Blue Edge by Susan Tepper
Červená Barva Press-2006

Susan Tepper's poetry is honest, filled with original insights that enrich the reader. Her lyrics are taut and moving, a joy to read. She is to be welcomed among the most accomplished poets writing today.
Simon Perchik

The collection has an elegant focus and hush around it...
Timothy Donnelly, Boston Review

Susan Tepper is a poet of quiet grace yet insistent power, who steals your mind's focus in odd moments long after you've laid down her book.
Don Williams, Editor, New Millennium Writings & Syndicated Columnist

Susan Tepper...on the page, shimmers through everyday thoughts, bringing life to streams and smoke and snow. Her gentle vision beautifully informs her well-crafted poems in "Blue Edge."
Suzi Winson, Fish Drum

Readers of Grasslimb will be familiar with Susan Tepper's fine poetry... We can enthusiastically recommend this fine further exploration of her work.
Valerie Polichar, Grasslimb

Susan's poetry is in touch with the human race... reaps with the knowledge of a poet well versed.
Shirley Gerald Ware, Fresh! Literary Magazine

$6.00 | 30 Pages | In Stock

 

Fishing in Green Waters by Judy Ray Fishing in Green Waters by Judy Ray
Červená Barva Press-2006; Second Printing-2007

"Sometimes, fishing in green waters, we draw up words in a fine net," says poet Judy Ray in her poem, "Sometimes." This "fine net" could easily describe her chapbook, Fishing in Green Waters, recently published by Červená Barva Press. In poems that take the reader from Tiananmen Square, to the Midwest flatlands, to the emotional landscape of Frida Kahlo, Fishing in Green Waters makes for a remarkable read. Ranging in tone from whispered quiet ("Let us lullaby to sleep the weary unseeing eyes") to breathless, imagistic cross-cuts ("[The poem] looks for the flash of the pileated woodpecker, finds the splash of blood in a schoolyard"), Ray reels in the political, the personal, and the historical in her tightly woven poems.
Gloria Mindock, Editor, Červená Barva Press

(Excerpt of Review)
The beauty of this poetry chapbook was the surprises I witnessed each time I turned the page. The author was quite adept in addressing different themes and different places. This rendered a kaleidoscope of writing and filled me with anticipation. --Francis Alix
Small Press Review, July-August, 2006

$6.00 | 35 Pages | In Stock

 

Oh Angel chapbook Oh Angel by Gloria Mindock
U ŠOKU ŠTAMPA-2005

If you don't believe in angels, this compelling collection of poems about them might give you pause for thought. Among the kinds of angels Gloria Mindock addresses are male and female, guardian, loyal, and fallen angels, even a vacationing angel. As in the title poem, which opens the book, she often exclaims, "Oh angel," in conjecture, disappointment, pique, passion, or some other emotion. Angels dominate her consciousness, her moods, her actions. For instance, "Wild" begins, "Oh angel, at dawn, / I get up and sit in the nicest room," and in "Guardian Angel Sits on Left" she says, "The angel is curled against / me . . . / She protects me." But by the end of the poem, "The angel went on to / guard another." Though desirable, angels can sometimes be disloyal, like people. In "Wings" the speaker chides a traitor angel and then reproaches a lover who has deserted her: "Oh Herman-stupid man / Prodigies won't help / Poetry is necessary / just like me." This passage recalls Wallace Stevens' "necessary angel," his name for the imagination, whose necessary product is poetry. Stupid Herman "jumped out too soon," leaving the speaker at first bereft but then with a new subject for a poem, a new sense of worth. Oh Gloria, what else are lovers and angels for?
--George Held

To read a review of Oh Angel visit: http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2006_02_12_dougholder_archive.html

$5.50 | 16 Pages | In Stock: Sold Out

 

The Whole Enchilada chapbook The Whole Enchilada by Ed Miller
Červená Barva Press-2006

Think of The Whole Enchilada as an absurdist playground, and you're invited. There you'll find an abundance of whooping, hollering, cussing and adolescent ridicule. There you'll find a lot of sand being flung around, kicked around. It's a ruckus of mockeries, a splenetic free-for-all.

The poems: more than a few are found-text pieces, derived from the ephemera and detritus of life, which are combined or manipulated or both; some are casual narratives; some began as correspondence and later stood trembling on their own.

$6.00 | 48 Pages | In Stock

 

W Is for War chapbook W Is for War by George Held
Červená Barva Press-2006

In one way or another, ranging from inconvenience to death, we all become victims of war. In these fine, even-toned poems, Mr. Held outlines the price in folly and flesh paid by all sides. Ultimately, war is the last of last resorts--and not to be undertaken but for the direst circumstances.
THE ICONOCLAST #94

W Is for War, a new poetry chapbook by political activist George Held. In this collection of poems, his ninth, George expresses his protest against the war in Iraq. "Because he supports our men and women in arms, he resists sending them into battle without compelling, legitimate reasons."

The whole collection hangs together very well. I admire your guts in publishing the volume, and I'm glad I own a copy as it's a little piece of history. --Gretchen Fletcher

WIFW gives precise and true voice to what many patriots think. It's courageous and passionate. --Michael Graves

Some of your best work is in this book. They say no one in love ever wrote a good love poem, the point being that passion gets in the way of craftsmanship. But it hasn't in your case. --James McGowan

This chapbook is wonderfully cohesive, and I admire the way you move through the war by moving through all the players: President, populations on both sides, a Vietnam vet, poets writing on the war, a mother and child, a single Everyman speaker, and by invoking the government of ancient Rome. This endows the collection with variety, a quality I prize highly in any collection. --Margot Farrington

Small Press Review /September-October Picks, 2006

$7.00 | 29 Pages | In Stock

 

Plays

Passions by Denis Emorine Passions (monodrama) by Denis Emorine
Translated from the French by Brian Cole
Červená Barva Press, 2010

Denis Emorine is the author of short stories, essays, poetry, and theater. He was born in 1956 in Paris and studied literature at the Sorbonne (University of Paris). His theatrical output has been staged in France and Russia. He has a great interest for Eastern Europe. In 2004, he won first prize (French) for his poetry at the Féile Filiochta International competition. His poetry has been published in Pphoo (India), Blue Beat Jacket (Japan), Snow Monkey, Cokefishing, Be Which Magazine, Poesia, (USA). His texts have been published in numerous e-zines including Cipher Journal, Mad Hatter's Review, Milk, The Salt River Review, Istanbul Literary Review, and WHL Review. His last publication was a play called, "On The Platform," (Červená Barva Press).

$7.00 | 16 Pages | In Stock
On The Platform by Denis Emorine On The Platform
A play by Denis Emorine
Translated by Brian Cole, Červená Barva Press, 2008

Cover Art: L' Echo oculaire by Farah Willem Dahri

On the Platform, by Denis Emorine, takes us to a crowded platform where impatient travelers wait for a train from Paris. We are introduced to a character named Laure. She is waiting for her fiancé Julien to arrive. Is it chance or fate that Laure meets a man named Marek? What transpires is an encounter we may all one day face. How extraordinary that in this crowded landscape, Laure realizes her destiny and his are intertwined.

Denis Emorine perfectly captures the torment of Marek and the innocence of Laure, imparting to us a vivid picture of his tortured soul and her radiant spirit. But, as the whims of Fate are unavoidable, Laure's life takes a profound turn…
-Gloria Mindock, Červená Barva Press

$14.00 | ISBN: 978-0-615-25983-3 | 42 Pages

 

E-books

No One is Safe by Susan Tepper No One is Safe
by Susan Tepper
Červená Barva Press, 2007

Susan Tepper, a three-time Pushcart Nominee, writes poetry, fiction and essays. Her work has appeared in American Letters & Commentary, Green Mountains Review, Boston Review, Salt Hill, New Millennium Writings, Snake Nation Press, Schuylkill Valley Journal, Wilderness House Literary Review, Grasslimb, Pavement Saw and Poesia.

In 2006, Červená Barva Press published her poetry collection "Blue Edge." Two of her novels are currently making the publishing rounds.

Sassy, sensitive, and suspenseful, Susan Tepper's No One Is Safe is something you must read.
-Laurie Graff author, You Have To Kiss A Lot Of Frogs and Looking For Mr. Goodfrog

"No One is Safe" is a haunting story that taps into the core of our fears. Susan Tepper has masterfully shown us what happens when one's security and freedom are taken away."
Ellen Litman, author "The Last Chicken in America"

Read it online now!

 

Legend an ebook by Martin Golan The Life and Death of a Literary Legend
by Martin Golan
Červená Barva Press, 2007

In this hilarious life and death tale of a famous literary magazine, Martin Golan pulls no punches. Anyone who has traversed the often treacherous waters of publishing will appreciate this candid story, presented with humor and a twist of lemon.
--Susan Tepper

For anyone in the literary scene, whether you are an editor or writer, or a lover of words, you will find this story hysterically funny. Take a journey with Martin and the New York Literary Review and watch the fate one magazine can bring!
--Gloria Mindock, Editor, Červená Barva Press

"Being an editor of a literary magazine, I found this story of the life and death of a New York Lit mag. profoundly funny, and profoundly embarrassing. If you ever been in the world of literary magazines, poets and writers you will recognize the ruses, the players and yourself. At the end you will feel like your fly is down."
--Doug Holder/ Ibbetson Update

Read it online now!

 

Streets Of Flowers Cover STREETS OF FLOWERS
by Martin Golan
Červená Barva Press, 2007

In "Streets of Flowers," a college student who yearns to be a writer finds inspiration in the flowery names of the streets where he walks and in the beauty of a woman in his writing class. Spurred on by the breathless reviews he imagines in his head, he presents a poem about the woman to the class, in a scene that will be familiar to anyone who has presented work they cared deeply about in a writers' workshop. His experience in the class, coupled with an evening alone with the woman, teaches him a great deal: though he does not yet fully understand it, he has found not only his path but also himself.

Read it online now!

 

When Annie Fell Off The Mountain Cover WHEN ANNIE FELL OFF THE MOUNTAIN
by Martin Golan
Červená Barva Press, 2007

"When Annie Fell Off The Mountain" is a love story set in the world before Roe v. Wade, a world where a foolish moment of impetuosity leads to sneaking around back alleys and clandestine meetings in filthy motels. A man – now happily married and with children of his own – looks back on his and onetime girlfriend Annie's harrowing pursuit of an illegal abortion. He sees for the first time that it was harder for her in ways he would never understand. It comes to him that just being a man, or being the kind of man he was, shielded him from the worst of it, how – as when Annie slipped on a mountain at the story's start, and in the search to terminate her pregnancy, even now in his life – he has always been standing on safe, solid ground.

Read it online now!

 

Gilgamesh
by Martin Burke

A free e-book to read online or download

I have always had a special spot in my heart for the story of Gilgamesh because of writing music and singing the 72 sections of the text based on sin-leqi-unninni's version written around 1300 B.C. I find it extremely amazing that most of the columns have survived. In the epic, Gilgamesh ruled in one of the first historical cities which would now be Iraq.

The following is a description of Gilgamesh taken from the Theatre S. program in 1989.

In the epic, Gilgamesh is a powerful King in need of a companion. So Enkidu is created for him out of the wilderness. After they travel together and defeat a monster in the forest, Enkidu dies. Stricken with grief, Gilgamesh journeys alone to the end of the earth to seek the answer to humanity's mortality.

I love Martin Burke's version of Gilgamesh and think it is beautifully written. It is no easy task to take on such an epic. He has definitely made it his own.

Gloria Mindock, Editor
Červená Barva Press

Click here to download Gilgamesh
(Microsoft Word version)

I Ching by Martin Burke I Ching
by Martin Burke

A free e-book to read online or download

Martin Burke -poet and playwright
Founder of the bilingual Theatre group 'Zonder Thuis'

"Burke is the eloquent essayist of the sublime"
Projected Letters

"His style is far ahead in terms of imaginative inventiveness:
This is startling, original work"
Kiosque Review

Biography is always of two kinds. There is the external biography of places lived in, books published and plays preformed. This is legitimated and this is included -but it is not the full story. True biography occurs in the mind that confronts certain issues and then gives them form in books and poems.
So it is that when I say I live in Flanders I am not just referring to the northern Flemish speaking area of Belgium. When I say Flanders I am touching an imaginative source that covers place and history, archetype and existential fact that roots into all the work I do. It was the Welsh poet Vernon Watkins who wrote "I have been luck in this one thing alone" -and this luck in living at a centre which proves to be a Temenos of the imagination both forwards in time and backwards in memory is something for which I am grateful. To live here was not a conscious choice. At least not initially so. I came on a holiday to visit a friend intending to stay for ten days or so. That was twenty seven years ago and still the holidays has not ended.
Not that the rooting into the roots of this place was instant. It wasn't. initially all poetry ceased when I moved here and for more than twenty years there was no poetry to be written. No thought which I could express. No word to which I could give expression. And then, four years ago, the mystery returned. All that had lain dormant sought utterance and brought with it the means of utterance. Since then I have applied myself to following this word down to its roots and into its future. And it is here that all that is implied by Flanders seems to me to be the perfect figure of time and timelessness of this borderline expression. The books have flowed and the word has not ceased and twenty years of wonderment are finding their long suppressed expression.
This then is the biography behind the biography -a biography locked into and bound up with the word Flanders.
More will follow and surprises await and yet I think I will always be able to centre it on this imaginative centre and that no matter how far I move I will not move far from it. The bio that follows should then be seen in this light

Born in Ireland but living now in Brugge, Belgium

Near Love Stories by J. B. Hogan Near Love Stories
by J. B. Hogan

A free e-book to read online or download

J. B. Hogan is a writer and poet living in Fayetteville, Arkansas. He has a Ph.D. in English (Literature) from Arizona State University (1979) and worked for many years as a technical writer. His short stories, poems, and non-fiction have appeared in: Istanbul Literary Review, Smokebox, The Scruffy Dog Review, Aphelion, Rumble, The Swallow’s Tail, Poesia, Bewildering Stories, Avatar Review, Copperfield Review, Ascent Aspirations, Megaera, The Pedestal Magazine, Dogwood Journal, Mastodon Dentist, The Square Table, Raving Dove, Mobius, Viet Nam Generation, The Mark Twain Journal, and San Francisco Review of Books.

 

Postcard Series

Postcard Series: One Postcard Series: One Designed by Gloria Mindock
Červená Barva Press-2005

(Excerpt of Review)
...the most striking quality of these twenty "postcards" is the radical exploration of both size and color, not only in the background but typography... Though black-on-white on their backsides, most of these glossy cards are simply beautiful enough to stand by themselves, individually mounted to one's walls.
--Richard Kostelanetz Small Press Review/November-December, 2005

$15.00 | 21 Postcards | Out of Stock

To order by mail...


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